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50,000 Miles in 22 months

Hello; I own a Honda 2011 cr-v se 4x4. Today i reach the 50,000 Miles mark and so far so good the only think i change so far was the engine oil, air filter and tires nothing else, nothing. My drive is about 100milles round trip i live in Bailey Colorado so most of the drive is down the hill and up the hill with few Miles on a dirt road to get to me house. Any advice will be apreciate

Are you following the owners manual maintenance guide, both on time and miles? Even if not listed, I’d do a fluids change if you haven’t done it already, using all Honda fluids (transmission, brake, cooling system).

last time i was in the dealer for my oil change i ask about that and they said if i need it will show up on my dashboard.

By the time the light goes on it’s already too late.
Check the manufacturer’s recommeneded service schedule that came with the car and see if your shop has been doing the recommended serviciing.

The dealer is correct. Modern cars with service interval lights are more intelligent than simple service intervals. They consider variables such as miles, time, speed, temperature, cold starts (causes more engine wear than miles), driving style, etc. Service your car when it tell you to. When your warranty expires, find a good local Honda specialist rather than the dealer for continued service.

You are not even 1/10 of the way to Rachel’s car.

http://www.streetfire.net/video/1964-mercury-comet-caliente-540000-miles_712665.htm

The service light is OK for oil changes, but for the other fluids (which makers sometimes skimp on) I’d do them now if they haven’t been done yet, regardless.

thank all for for your advice. my honda is been so good for me, i drive between the speed limit and in the morning because my car sleep outise with no roof of any type i cover with blankest and in the morning before i start driving i warm up for some time.

“before i start driving i warm up for some time”

More than 30 seconds is not helping the car unless it’s way below freezing.

could you explain why?
thank you

Because cars, like people, need to be moving in order for all of the systems to warm up together… Just idling, for example, doesn’t warm the differentials which should be done gradually, like the transmision and motor which should be put under light load of driving slowly. To drive a car real fast on the highway for example without driving slowly first, is like asking a spinter to get up out of a chair and run his fastest, even if he had a heating pad over his legs. Idling, like warming just one body part without motion, doesn’t prepare the entire system for the rigors of higer speeds.

Also, the engine warms up more slowly when idling than driving slowly and gently.
It’s a waste of time and gas.
Idling also lets more moisture collect in the exhaust system, speeding up rusting.
Every gallon of gas burned produces about a gallon of water.
When you drive away the exhaust warms up much faster and the moisture gets blown out.

Long warm ups sometimes made some sense 40 years ago when engines had carburetors.

Any advice will be apreciate

Sure! Move or get a new job!

If the windows are fogged or iced up in the morning, then 30 seconds isn’t long enough to drive away safely.

You are probably due for rear differential oil change, a transmission fluid drain and refill and then soon for brake fluid change.
I have the same car, only FWD, and only 8K miles on it. The road and wind noise is somewhat bothersome for me.

Sure! Move or get a new job!

WOW…how brilliant. It’s nice that some people have that option…but many of us don’t. I’ve been with the same company for about 10 years now. When I started working for them I was only 10 miles away…but the company has moved twice since then. Now I’m at a nice 80 mile round-trip commute. Getting a new job is possible…but not practical or desirable. So you live with the situation you have. I’m lucky in that I can probably get a good job closer to home. The job market for software engineers is booming. But many people don’t have that option. Can move because of family or they’re upside down on their mortgage. Can’t find a job anywhere closer. Move or get a new job is simplistic view…but not realistic.

A block heater above what you have been doing would be my only recommendation. We have vehicles back to 88 that get a 30 minute warmup and I can see no impact. My former truck a plow truck , 1993 f250 35k miles but probably more idle hours than driving hours, still going strong.

The only times it make sense today is for equipment that uses multi use hydraulic fluid that is warmed by turning the transmission with the motor. Everything operates better after the warm up which may take as long as 45 minutes. Fortunately, cars have separate fluid reservoir for different systems and don’t share the fluids.

I own a '11 Chevy Cruze Eco. I took delivery in May of '11, and it’s now approaching 57,000 miles. It has and continues to run flawlessly. I’ve been following the computer’s oil change recommendations, and rotate the tires every 10,000 or so miles, and they have plenty of tread left on them. Just pay attention to your owner’s manual’s service interval recomendations (You DID read that part, didn’t you?) and you should be fine.

It’s been a great car. I really like it and intend to keep it for a very long time. It gets great fuel mileage and is fun to drive.