02 Sensor- Can I nurse it with anti-seize?

subaru
legacy

#1

Took my car to the dealership today and WHOA too much to get it back up to snuff, so I’m going to tackle it myself with the help of the internet. One of the first things on the list is my front 02 sensor, and in this video @ 2:27 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mH7fycoGZsc&index=1&list=PLj8Fv0UAqzNDI2KFHqvGvSHaE6llK6qsS, it seems to suggest that I can simply add more anti-seize to the surface of the sensor and then reinsert it. Can I get away with this, or should I replace it, or is there any way to know?
Also, my understanding of it’s function is that it’s mostly to measure emission ratios, so I could get away with not changing it right now, yeah?


#2

Anti-seize just keeps the sensor from sticking in the mounting bung. It does not make a poorly-functioning one work better. It goes on the threads, not the working end of the sensor. In fact, you will destroy the sensor if you put anti-seize on the end of it.

The upstream oxygen sensor(s) is needed for the engine control computer to maintain the proper air/fuel ratio. There are no shortcuts.


#3

So i’ll take that as a no… ok, glad I got that squared. Thanks NYBo!


#4

The video shows a new sensor with a dab of anti-seize on it, the guy stated that it should have more. That is opinion. Your new oxygen sensor should come with a dab of anti-seize on it.

Note that the white clip that he pried off should unlock and rotate to separate the connectors, you do not pry off the white clip as he did in the video.


#5

In addition to the above comments, if you do this yourself be prepared with a propane torch and a long breaker bar. Oxygen sensor are often difficult to get out due to normal corrosion. Shops have the lift (a critical item IMHO) and the tools and experience to do the job. It can be really tough lying on your back under the vehicle.

Which reminds me, if you proceed with this be absolutely certain that the vehicle is extremely stable on its stands before getting under it. You’ll be using significant force to get the sensor out, and people die when their vehicles fall off the stands on them.


#6

Removing an O2 sensor can be dificult and the attempt can result in a broken sensor, a broken bung, broken wires above the sensor and other problems. It’s wise to size up the situation before twisting anything and being mindfull that if twisting gets difficult getting the sensor out then the twisting to get it or a new one installed might be impossible without special tools and a lift. If the bung gets damaged it can be dangerous to drive the car with an exhaust leak blasting at the transmission, fuel lines, wiring harnesses, etc.