Will a electric impact driver remove lug nuts?


#61

Well?

At least not you.

Tester


#62

I still want to know just how often the OP will use what ever tool he buys. My chrome plated 4 way is not that hard to use.


#63

Tester, let me know when you start using a torque wrench to install lugs nuts rather than the lug wrench that came with the car. Until you do, my earlier comment applies that anybody who uses a torque wrench… any torque wrench… is using far better protocol than most people (you included) do.

You don’t get it, do you? You’re using a lug wrench and criticizing my torque wrench protocols. That’s ludicrous.

Have you ever actually calibrated equipment in a cal lab and run compensation curves? Have you ever written calibration procedures? Or do you just send the equipment out and use it on trust?

Aw, the heck with it. I’m done with this debate. It isn’t worth the aggravation. I hope you start keeping a torque wrench in your trunk before you stretch a wheel stud some dark rainy night 50 miles from home.


#64

YOU ARE FUNNY!

I don’t have a torque wrench in the vehicle when a get a flat tire.

Does anybody else?

I use the tools that came with the vehicle required to replace that flat tire.

Then once that flat tire is replaced on the road, the tire is repaired/replaced once the vehicle is in the shop and lug nuts are torqued to spec.

Tester


#65
I use the tools that came with the vehicle required to replace that flat tire.

I would only say to add a 12-18" cheater-bar piece of pipe if you’re an old weakling like me.

;-]


#66

I’ve never heard of anybody keeping a torque wrench in the trunk for changing a flat, but I’ll bet there are a few folks out there who do. I’ve know some Silicon Valley Engineer who wouldn’t surprise me to discover they put a torque wrench in their car. We call these types of personalities, you know someone like Scotty on Star Trek who reads technical manuals for relaxation , “An Engineer’s Engineer” … lol …


#67

@“the same mountainbike”

What’s a “click-stop”?


#68

Guys, PLEASE flag the spammer!

I’m all for people going to church if they feel like it

But don’t quote that stuff here

This is not the place


#69

@cdaquila

We’ve got a bonafide spammer on our hands . . . !

:fearful:


#70

Now I have a question; I was looking up the prices on the cordless ones and they were much higher than the corded ones. I don’t have any problems dragging a cord or an air hose around, but seems like if I ever wanted to spend the money, I might be better off buying a pancake compressor and an air impact wrench. This is going to be only for casual use.


#71

A pancake compressor is for staple/nail guns. You will need a compressor with a 15 to 25 gallon tank to operate a 1/2 impact gun or wait for pressure recovery after each lug nut.

Try to remain calm, there is no need to close these threads just because the church lady passed by.


#72

@matt357 I have one of those Harbor Freight impact wrenches. I just weighed it on my postage scale. It weighs 6 lbs, 12 oz. It’s large, so it won’t fit in some smaller spots. I picked up some impact universal joints to get it in some spots where it won’t go straight on. I just have to be careful with them to keep the angle as straight as possible for safety.

It’s powerful enough to handle the lug nuts on my car easily. When I was changing the front disc brakes, it didn’t have enough power to break the caliper torque plate bolts loose. However, I think they were well overtightened previously. I used a 25" breaker bar to get those loose, and they screeched loudly when they broke loose. As a test, when I finished the brake job, and had torque the bolts correctly, I tried to use the wrench on them. It was able to take them off easily.

I’m satisfied with it for DIY work within its limitations. I keep the breaker bar handy just in case I need it.

BTW the click stop that you asked about is a type of torque wrench where you set the amount of torque you want to apply. Then use the wrench like a ratchet, and it will click and “give” a little when you have reached that level.


#73

@wmm2

“Your experiences with the tool are similar to mine.”

“I picked up some impact universal joints to get it in some spots where it won’t go straight on. I just have to be careful with them to keep the angle as straight as possible for safety.”

I have those, too, but I find the HF wobble socket extension set (1/2" set of 3 or 4 lengths), which is inexpensive, works well with the worry of over doing an angle with the universals. Take a look when you’re at HF.

I have had caliper carrier brackets and caliper mounting bolts that were really tight (from the factory) and wouldn’t come out with an ordinary breaker bar. Sometimes I can’t get a good swing (limited space) with a longer breaker bar, even with the wheels turned.

If the HF electric impact wrench won’t turn them, I let that HF electric impact wrench rattle away on those puppies for a while in stages (letting it cool) and eventually they break loose. Be sure the wrench is set on “reverse,” of course. I don’t use mine much, but it is definitely worth having on hand.

Mine works fine for lugs, but I usually don’t break it out for those. However, it has gotten me out of a bind with other fasteners after hand tools won’t cut it.

It reminds me of my old Honda motorcycle days of corroded thread Phillips (or cross ?) screws all over the engine, that were impossible without a hand/hammer impact screw-driver. Once out I’d replace them with socket head screws.
CSA


#74

“I picked up some impact universal joints to get it in some spots where it won’t go straight on. I just have to be careful with them to keep the angle as straight as possible for safety.”

“I have those, too, but I find the HF wobble socket extension set (1/2” set of 3 or 4 lengths), which is inexpensive, works well with the worry of over doing an angle with the universals. Take a look when you’re at HF."

I thought about this a bit. I could be wrong (not likely :wink: ), but I believe the rigid wobble extensions deliver more impact than do the universals because I just imagine that the joint in the universal absorbs a minute amount of the impact with each blow. It could make the difference when the impact is on the lower end of the wrench spectrum.
CSA


#75

My two cents : Impact wrench will affect the wheel nuts. I had aluminum nuts - the wrenches that broke them loose - not me - damaged them to death.

Me? I now use a HF breaker to loosen and the household battery-op Ryobi drill driver to spin them off, using a stack of 1/4"-3/8"-1/2" adapters. It works! Then to go back, Ryobi til snug, torque wrench to finish. No torque sticks.

Isn’t worth the plunge into the air compressor kingdom for me… electric though,… One day maybe…


#76

Really??? Aluminum??


#77

Yeah, they make them but count me as one who will not use them.

I’m curious how you damaged them from taking them off. Normally, if you get thread damage on removal, it is actually damage that happened on tightening. Removal just reveals the damage that was done. Unless you’re taking about external damage and that’s normally due to a mismatch on the socket to lug…