Tire pull?


#1

EVERY SINCE MY TIRE DEALER PUT ON A NEW SET OF TIRES ON MY 2005 VW BUG IN IS PULLING TO THE RIGHT. THE TIRES ARE NOT CHEAP (GENERAL ALTIMAX HP). A WHEEL ALIGNMENT WAS DONE AND THE ALIGNMENT IS CORRECT. THE TIRE DEALER SAID IT HAS TO BE “TIRE PULL”. THE FRONT WHEELS (TIRES) WERE SWITCHED AND IT STILL PULLS TO THE RIGHT. CAN NEW TIRE TREAD REALLY CAUSE THIS PROBLEM? TIRE PULL?

DAVE

DAVE


#2

…and what does the dealer think should be done to resolve it? To me, admitting to “tire pull” means providing me a new set of tires – obviously the tires are the issue. Not sure that is the truth, but a logical outcome of the dealer’s answer. I think the dealer has not properly acted on the problem.

Tirerack.com shows a step by step process in diagnosing tire pull in new tires. I would print it out and demand that the tire dealer accomplish those steps. The kicker is that tire manufacturers are not warranting conicity problems throughout the life of the tire, so diagnosing and correcting early in tire life is important. If the link doesn’t work, google tire pull and you will find the article.

Link is: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=12http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=12


#3

I have seen seen new tires cause a pull more than once; including the last set I bought for my Lincoln Mark. It was pulling when I left the tire shop but having no desire to return and sit in the waiting room for hours I simply swapped the 2 fronts myself at home. and the problem was solved.

I agree with jayhawkroy about the dealer being responsible for this no matter what it takes. If moving the rears to the front does not solve it then they should either try another set of tires or even possibly go with another brand.


#4

When I got my 1993 Caprice in 2002, it had a severe pull to the right. The tires had about 4k at the time. Two alignments and a front/rear rotation did not help. As suggested by the other posters, I swapped the front tires side to side and the pull was gone. I rotated the tires recently and noticed a mild pull to the right, another side to side swap and the car was fine. Still, they’re brand new tires and the dealer should make it right.

Ed B.


#5

New tires can cause the problem. I’d be looking for a stuck caliper, however. Drive a couple miles on the highway and either pull over into a safe spot or exit using the brakes as little as possible to stop. Get out and see if one front wheel is warmer than the other. If so, you probably have a stuck caliper. Do the same for the rear wheels. Fronts are usually slightly warmer than rears because of the extra work load when stopping.

I do this every few months or so as a routine check. My aluminum wheels make it easy for me. I found a sticky rear caliper on one side at 85k miles and the other got sticky at 110k miles. There were no symptoms. I replaced them with rebuilt calipers that have proven to be just as good as new ones. This routine check is a smart thing to do, especially if a long trip is coming up. Also do it on the trip, if you think of it. Had I not found the problem early, I would have had to replace a lot more than the calipers!

I wouldn’t touch a disk or caliper directly if hub caps prevent an accurate test, but touching them with a gloved finger or the inside of the steel wheel with a bare hand should be possible. Just be sure nothing’s smoking!


#6

I Use A Non-Contact Infrared Thermometer With Laser Pointer

You just point it and read the temp. With some wheels, you can shoot the disk right through the spokes. Mine has a huge temperature range (way below 0 to 1400F) and cost about $50 on sale. Works great for cheking radiators, A/C, etcetera, and I’ve even used it in the house to find energy leaks. It’s a fun tool to have.


#7

Check your air pressure.

I’m not guaranteeing that’s the problem, but you should check.