Timing belt

toyota
corolla

#1

I called a toyota service advisor about when I should change my timing belt he said 60.000 mi or 4 years I did not know there was a time limit on the belt I took it to my local mechanic and he said the milege is all I should be concerned with not the time limit my engine is a 1.6 also my mechanic said if the belt breaks nothing bad can happen to the motor only that it will stop running I have heard certain cars can be damage badly if a timing belt breaks im confused can you please help Ronny


#2

We are confused also, since you failed to supply some information that is necessary to give you an answer. Please tell us the car’s model year and odometer mileage.


#3

They’re both wrong. Time is a consideration but 4 years is normally a bit early.

If the engine is a free-wheeler (meaning it’s a non-interfernce fit, no engine damage if it breaks) then yes, the engine will stop running immediately if the belt breaks.

There’s a downside though to this other than engine damage.
You can be left stranded anywhere at any time for one.
The other is that the belt may snap and leave you in a situation where you could be injured or killed. Pulling out in traffic, loaded semi on your tail at highway speeds, crossing a set of train tracks, etc.


#4

The other is that the belt may snap and leave you in a situation where you could be injured or killed. Pulling out in traffic, loaded semi on your tail at highway speeds, crossing a set of train tracks, etc.

This is not a timing belt story, but I once had an ignition module do a sudden failure somewhere in the middle lane of a limited access highway at about 70 mph. This is not even slightly cool. Very high pucker factor.

Don’t mess with the timing belt. But as ok4450 mentioned they are both wrong. He is right. What you want to do is look at what your owner’s manual says. If you don’t have one, find one so that you know things like this. It will specify a time/mileage whichever is first. Follow it.


#5

If this buggy is 4 years old it has a chain and does not need servicing. Toyota switched to chains on their 4-pot Corolla engines back about a decade ago.


#6

I should have given the year of my car ita a 1996 with a belt


#7

1996 145.000 mi belt and water pump change at 114.000 mi


#8

It’s a belt. And a noninterference engine.

But it should still be changed. As already mentioned, it could break down at the absolute worse time in the absolute worse circumstances. No good can come from a breakdown. Only bad.


#9

Well, now that we know the year of the car, at least I can say that one bit of info given by your mechanic was correct, namely the fact that this is not an interference design engine.

However, as ok4450 observed, even if you don’t sustain engine damage when it snaps, you could be endangering yourself and others when it snaps–depending upon when and where it happens. For reasons that I will never fathom, many folks seem to envision catastrophic mechanical problems taking place in their driveway or in some other convenient and safe location. In reality, it is just as likely–if not more likely–that events like a snapped timing belt will take place on the road.

You have not told us how many years have elapsed since the belt was replaced at 114k miles. If it has been 5 years or longer, you are overdue for this important maintenance. And, as was already stated, the answer to your question is actually contained in your Owner’s Manual. If you don’t have a manual, you need to get one–for many reasons.


#10

Wait for it to break and you’ll be paying for a tow in addition to getting the belt fixed.


#11

I had a timing belt snap on the highway once on a NON-Interference engine…

Luckily I was near an exit and just coasted off the highway (light traffic) and off the ramp down a small side-street. 2 hours later I had the belt fixed and was on may way…But I was LUCKY there wasn’t any traffic.


#12

then ask if they should fix it or buy a new car