Timing belt replacement interval 2004 Subaru Impreza?


#1

A friend of mine just purchased a used 2004 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport (station wagon, non-turbo) with 115,000 miles on its odometer.

I was explaining the importance of having the timing belt replaced, since there’s no proof of it having been done, but I don’t know the recommended interval in years or miles.

I’m sure it’s due, or past due, on both counts, but does anyone know the correct Subaru-recommended interval for this car, or how I can find out.

She’s unlikely to read the owner’s manual no matter who recommends it, but I think I can convince her the timing belt/water pump service is worth the money, since she plans to keep the car for a while.

Thanks,

mc


#2

The recommened timing belt replacement mileage is 105,000. So replacement is overdue. Also tell your friend that the engine is an interference engine. That means if the timing belt fails engine damage will most likely occur.

Tester


#3

mcparadise wrote:
She’s unlikely to read the owner’s manual no matter who recommends it, but I think I can convince her the timing belt/water pump service is worth the money, since she plans to keep the car for a while.

It sounds like this car will be a lost cause sooner or later. Personally, I wouldn’t bother getting involved.


#4

Thanks, Tester.

I thought it was somewhere in that area, but I couldn’t remember from when I had my '96 Legacy. I know about the interference engine in the 2004, which is why I’m recommending having the belt replaced right away.

Lion9car,

Too late, I’m already involved, but thanks for the advice. Actually, since she’ll be taking the car to a Subaru dealer for service, it may get more care, rather than less. You know how dealers are.


#5

I skipped the water pump but an important item is tensioner.

I was charged $450 for a timing belt/tensioner no water pump on a 2005 Legacy GT (turbo 2.5L).


#6

Andrew_j,

$450 is not bad. Not bad at all. I told her to expect $500-750 at a Subaru dealer. I like to do the water pump, since it’s driven by the timing belt, at the same time.

Is the timing belt tensioner hydraulic?

When I replaced the timing belt on my '96 Legacy I had to compress the tensioner (not an easy thing) and put a pin in the shaft in order to install it, then remove the pin to tension the belt.

Do the newer cars use a similar tensioner, or are they spring-loaded?

I will suggest a new tensioner either way, but I’m curious.