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Time to unload my Camry?

2005 Camry V6XLE with 153,000 miles. Starting to need parts replacement, ex: timing belt. Should keep and repair or time to buy a new one?

Nancy , I have no idea how anyone on the web can answer that for you. We can’t see or drive the vehicle. Timing belt is a normal service expense for many vehicles . If you can afford a new vehicle then that is your choice . The thing is 14 years old so repairs are to be expected. Why not get some prices on what you need to have done then decide if you want to put the money in this.

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As long as the rest of the car is been taken care of I see no real reason to get rid of it just because of normal repairs. A friend has a slightly newer Camry and she’s got over 300,000 miles and going for 400,000 before buying a new car.

Have your mechanic give the car a thorough inspection (as if you were buying it as a used car) then decide if it’s worth keeping.

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A new car is probably about 25-30 grand. If you put about 5 thou into this one for brakes, struts, timing belt, which may be overdue at those miles, tires would it be worth keeping it a few more years. Is the body good, not much rust, accessories all function, no leaks.

We just bought a new KIA Niro hybrid which we’re very happy with. It’s a real jump in technology and you may feel it’s a good reason to buy a more current model just for that. Had a 04 VW diesel and a 02 Camry. Got rid of the VW, never again. The Camry we’ll put a couple of grand into it, brakes, struts etc and use it as a ‘knock around town’ car.

If you can afford it purchase a new car. I have learned now repairing that Camry will just be throwing good money after bad.

What condition is the car in . . . ?!

How many miles are you driving per year?

If the car is in excellent shape, has been maintained well, and you’re only driving a few thousand miles per year, it might make more sense to hang onto the Camry for a little longer

here’s an important question . . . how frequently have you been servicing the automatic transmission fluid and filter?

Are you a car salesman? Have you seen the OP’s vehicle in person, and have knowledge that the rest of us do not? Unless this thing has rust or body damage, 153,000 miles is nothing for a Toyota Camry, especially with the V-6 engine. (I have heard that the 4-cylinder from this generation is unreliable, but this car is not equipped with that engine.)

Also, the timing belt replacement (which should also include a new tensioner, water pump, etc.) is not a “repair” unless it has already broken. It is considered maintenance, and this is a cost which should be amortized over the time in which you will drive the car once the maintenance is done. In other words, if it costs $1000 to have the timing belt changed, and you have this done every 10 years, that’s only $100 per year to have this service done and not worry.

Assuming another $100-150 per year for tires, brakes, and oil changes, the timing belt replacement only brings this car to a respectable $250 per year in maintenance and repair costs. Even if it needs an expensive repair such as new struts all around, that too should be amortized over the time which the car can reasonably last–which if it is rust-free could be another 10+ years.

So unless you’re being offered another car for $0 down, $0 per month, and expected repair costs of less than $300 per year on average, I’d keep the Camry and drive on!

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Replacing a timing belt is routine maintenance. You wouldn’t buy a new car because your current car needs tires, would you?
The Toyota 6 cylinder is reliable. I have three Toyota’s with each one over 230k miles, and going strong.

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Why are you telling me to buy a new car ?

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I used to work with a woman who couldn’t distinguish between routine maintenance and repairs.
When my car was in the shop 2 or 3 times each year for routine maintenance, she always said, “Your car is being repaired… again?”. I tried to explain the difference between maintenance and repairs, but eventually I just gave up on trying to educate her on this point.

In any event, if the OP’s car doesn’t have significant rust damage, and if it has been properly maintained on a consistent basis, then she doesn’t really need a new car… unless she just wants one. If she has the financial resources to buy a new car, and if she wants to reward herself, then… Why not?

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Get the timing belt replaced and spend another happy 153K miles driving it.

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Thank you. Happy holidays!

Thank you. Happy holidays/1

Thank you. I have also had numerous Toyota’s and with good performance; this is just the first one that has accumulated so many miles.

Happy holidays!

Thank you. Happy holidays!

The car is in good condition, put about 10,000 miles per year commuting to work and regularly have it serviced. It seems you and others feel having this maintenance is a wise choice. Thank you for your input. Happy holidays!

This is my 8th Camry over many years and I have found them to be very reliable. Car is in good condition and your recommendation, along with others, is to having the timing belt replaced and keep the car! Thank you for your input. Happy holidays!

Thank you; good advice.

Happy holidays!