Subaru Outback 2008 Radiator replacement


#1

Hi, as a result of accident repair, my radiator in my 2008 2.5i Limited Outback Wagon must be replaced. I see on the estimate that the shop has ordered an aftermarket radiator for a MANUAL transmission rather than one for an AUTOMATIC transmission. I have read, in general, that the radiator has a cooling feature for automatic transmissions that is not included with radiators for manual transmissions. They have already installed this in the car and it’s ready to be picked up, but I just now learned that this may be a problem.

I want to keep this car for many years and want the repair done correctly to ensure proper performance and longevity. Is this ok, or is my transmission, performance, and the longevity of my car at risk if a radiator for a manual transmission is used rather than for an auto transmission?


#2

You most definitely need a radiator with an integral automatic transmission cooler.
It is your right to have the car repaired properly, and if I were you, I would insist on the correct radiator. Otherwise, your trans is going to have a very short life once you start driving it again.


#3

You will certainly want to verify this, but it is highly unlikely that you got a radiator for a manual transmission, despite what they ordered. In most catalogs, you will see a fit guide that says that it fits both or if you look up the manual and then the automatic versions, they will have the same part number.

the only difference is the cooling coil for the automatic transmission fluid. Often it is less costly to make one model that fits two applications than to have the separate assembly lines and excess inventory.


#4

Thanks! Good info!


#5

Well just in case, the cooling lines from transmission go to the bottom tank of the radiator. When you look down on the backside of the radiator, you should be able to see them. They should be connected to two nipples on the tank. If they are not, then the body shop would have had to put a nipple between the lines or there would be transmission fluid all over the place when the engine is started.

If your not sure, have the body shop show you the transmission line connections.


#6

Thanks again, I’ve been looking for that info and haven’t seen it in the diagrams I’ve found so that really helps. I have a long list of questions - should have just told them I’d pay the difference for a real Subaru part so I could trust it. Thanks.