Scissor jack length


#1

tried to edit my story. I dont see what prevents the screw from backing out as you lower jack. but i figure there is something done to the threads?this is ford jack which i do not have. this is a low as jack will go? see my most recent post


#2

So you want to use the jack which came with the car, which is the wrong jack, but make it work by installing a 14 inch screw, rather than the screw in there now? It seems like that should work ok. You can stake the end of the screw if you want, or just leave it in-staked if you don’t mind that it comes loose if you unscrew it too far. Make sure the tool you use to turn the screw works with the screw you install of course. Not sure if you’ll need a certain grade of screw or not. Scissor jacks come in handy around the home also, b/c – unlike hydraulic jacks – they work in any orientation. I use an old car scissor’s jack I found alongside the road to true up soil retaining walls from time to time.


#3

Do not try to modify a scissor jack.These things can fail, causing injuries or death.
If you notice your scissor jack getting very hard to turn, this is probably the first sign of failure. Look very closely at the threaded screw and what it passes through. Make sure there are no metal strands wrapped around the threaded screw - a sign of failing threads.This video is a good example of a failed scissor jack. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRi1HTlU7yk


#4

The picture you posted, is that your jack and spare?

Or what it’s supposed to look like ?

Because that jack you’re showing fits inside a 16 inch rim just fine.


#5

Can you raise the jack so the messed up threads are exposed? If so clean them up. Might just be debris of some sort. Maybe use a thread file if needed. Could also try something like a fender washer on the hold down bolt to keep it more secure.


#6

,This is really bad advice.Do not mess around with the treads on a scissor jack


#7

Making sure the threads are clear, clean and free of defects is bad advice? Well actuall the best advice would be scrapping the scissors jack completely and just getting a bottle jack and jack stands. But not everyone feels like hauling that around.


#8

This is a good example of a failed jack. I hope the guy was not changing a tire when it failed


#9

Ok, you still didn’t answer the question. We all know scissor jacks suck. Just barely a step better tan the old bumpers jacks.


#10

Cavell, can you find the proper jack at an auto recycler? That’s where I’d look. It can be fun.


#11

this is my jack in 14" opened length. i could cut couple inches off of screw but i think the foot is too wide so it still wont fit right inside the wheel. going to find a ford jack


#12

You’re sure it’s supposed to fit inside the wheel? Most are stored elsewhere these days.


#13

See post #1


#14

The picture matches the image in the owners manual. It seem odd that they would equip the car with a jack that can’t be lowered short enough to fit under a car with a flat tire.

Is the “nut” is the steel extension that is on the left side of the jack in the picture?


#15

I’m guessing the nut is here:

Nut


#16

seems the jack can be lowered but it will not fit inside wheel if it is