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Program/calibrate quadrasteer module?

I bought a 2003 2500 4x4 suburban a couple of weeks back. The seller had purchased and installed a new module for the quadrasteer system before I bought it, but hadn’t had it programmed yet. Not sure what’s involved in programming the module - something best left to a chevy dealer? From what I understand, quadrasteer is relatively rare because GM had priced it out of sight, but those who have it love it so I want to get it working (seller told me he can do a U-turn on a two lane road + a foot or so of shoulder on each side - pretty unreal for something that size).

Any shop with a Tech 2 scanner should be able to reprogram the module for you. Quadrasteer was rare not just because of the price but also the limited choices it came on .No 1/2 ton Suburban’s were equipped and if you wanted the 3/4 ton suburban with the diesel you couldn’t have the quadrasteer. Only offered on a few versions of the pickups with the exception of the Denali pickup where it was standard. The idea was that after a few years exclusive to GM they would license the technology to other makes, that as far as I know was abandoned.

It does work as advertised but those who own them now can’t always find parts such as the module or people who really understand how the system works. Alignment shops for example.

Thanks for the input - really appreciate your insight

Quadrasteer was developed by Delphi by the old Saginaw Steering Gear division. It was only developed on the big Dana 60 rear axle used in 3/4 ton trucks. It used an electric motor powered steering rack bolted to the axle cover. The whole thing was massively heavy and caused the rear of 1/2 ton trucks to ride pretty badly. They steered great, especially with a trailer. It was, as @wolyrobb said, very expensive. $4500 when first offered, if I remember correctly. Dropped to $2500 to increase sales. I’d guess quite a few ended up in the boneyard if they broke swapped out with a standard axle because of the cost and difficulty of repair.