Most efficient cars?


#1

I’m just seeking some knowledge on cars that are more ‘reliable’ as I’m currently looking for a car after a bad experience with my recent car.
My demands are; under 8k pricing, petrol efficient, model year to be 2007+, and that would be considered as a safe buy? basically which car would you recommend your grandma to be driving?


#2

This question does not have a real answer from the internet. We all have bias opinions. $8000.00 for a used vehicle is gamble territory. Simply put a person has to find what they want , have a trusted mechanic look at for a fee and hope for the best.

Besides if I say model XYZ is the most reliable vehicle ever made how would you know if I even knew what I was talking about.


#3

I understand what you’re saying, but, I’m very confused as to what to buy and my mechanic told me to ask him for advice on my next car purchase, so I thought perhaps someone out there would have an answer? For example, would you recommend a Holden Barina in a sense of what the chances of it reaching the 200km target; obviously that also depends on how well it’s taken care of but still.


#4

At your price point, forget efficiency. Overall ownership cost should be your criteria.

If you live in North America, the choice is different from where else you live. Please tell us.

A used Hyundai Accent with low mileage would cost much less than $8000 and provide economical and reliable transportation.

A good 2007 Toyota Corolla can be had for less than $5000. A Honda Civic would do as well. Both Kia Forte and Hyundai can be had for $8000. A Mazda 3 would be a good choice as well.

Grandma would be perfectly happy in a Honda Civic or Toyota Corolla. The Corolla is the world’s most bullet-proof car, but it may be called something else in Australia, like “Auris”.`

In North America I would stay away from any Volkswagen, any Nissan with a CVT transmission, or Ford Focus.

Don’t buy a used hybrid car, no matter how tempting.


#5

Cheers for the reply, I live in Australia.


#6

Isn’t this an Australian made vehicle that has closed it’s factory? Most of the regulars here are United States based. Your mechanic gave you best advice you are going to get.


#7

Toyota Corolla, Honda Civic, or Mazda 3 or maybe a Camry or Accord if you want something a bit bigger.

Ford Crown Vic or Mercury Grand Marquis. My grandparents (on both sides of my family) drove those cars exclusively. They didn’t give a rats arse about fuel economy though.


#8

Any thoughts on;

  • 2011 Hyundai Getz S Auto MY09

  • 2008 Hyundai Elantra SX Auto

  • 2015 Mitsubishi Mirage ES LA Auto MY15

  • 2014 Mitsubishi Mirage ES LA Auto MY14


#9

Yes, they are all vehicles.


#10

Actually, it is an even bigger gamble that you thought, owing to the difference in the value of the Australian dollar vs the US dollar. When the Australia-based OP states that she wants to buy a reliable vehicle for less than $8k, that would translate to a US-based buyer stating that he/she wants to buy a reliable vehicle for less than $6k.

Yes, a major gamble–no matter what make of vehicle one is considering.

All I can say is to seek a vehicle–no matter what make or model–that comes with hard copies of its maintenance records that you can compare to the mfr’s maintenance schedule. A vehicle that has been very well-maintained is likely to be the most reliable, but even then, it would need to be inspected by the OP’s mechanic prior to purchase.


#11

Isn’t the Holden a GM vehicle?

Yep

Now who knows what parts were actually used so that would be one issue, if it is a Daewo or a Pontiac, etc. But seems to me if you find a nice one, and the mechanic checks it out, and the parts don’t seem to be trouble prone, you could be OK.


#12

I believe Holden is now built by GM Korea, formerly Daewoo. The high cost of manufacturing in Australia led all, and I mean all, auto manufacturers to announce that they would close their Australian operations. Toyota might be the only one left, and they will close in about a year.


#13

Don’t know what to recommend, but If I needed to replace my daughters car (college kid) I was looking at a 2007 Ford Focus, 80k miles, manual trans, dealer had done front wheel bearing and breaks, $5700. Luckily her car survived a timing chain failure for $1200.


#14

What kind of breaks ?


#15

Hopefully, they were the type of “breaks” that aren’t very expensive to repair…


#16

And I thought to myself I am not going to misspell brakes, and I did. I hate getting senile, but get to meet brand new people every day!


#17

There is a relatively old saying that tells us…The only good thing about dementia and Alzheimer’s is that you get to hide your own Easter eggs.
:smirk:


#18

A friend’s father used to say, ‘no more re-runs for me!’, after he got old.

Consumer Reports has reliability ratings for used cars.


#19

Consumer Reports might not be much help in Australia ,


#20

They still rated my Pontiac bad and I’ve been happy with it since 2010. So gotta take their ratings with a bar of soap. People rate them bad if there is a body squeak somewhere or the radio went out or had to bring it to the dealer for something. In 125K no problems except spark plug wires and a smashed headlight housing.