Maintenance Question on a new vehicle


#1

Hello!

So, I ended up with a 2015 Kia Sportage (brand new). I looked in the owners manual maintenance section, and it lists maintenance every 7,500 miles. Is this safe to do with regular oil? Obviously at my first oil change, I will switch to synthetic (that’s what I’ve always gone 7,500k miles on).

Also, I have read several things online saying to change your oil early (first oil change) to get any metal shavings out of the engine, etc. Is there any truth to that?

Anyway, I was just surprised to see that type of mileage interval on regular oil.

Thanks all!


#2

Engines used to me machined with rocks, literally. These left some grit in the engine that was not always removed. Todays engines are machined with carbide and/or diamond inserts and leave the engine pretty clean.

If your engine specifies 0w20 oil, that is only available as a synthetic, at least at this time.

If your engine is 0w20, it may be a special version put in at the factory that has some micro-abrasives in it to polish and break-in the engine. It needs to be left in for a specified time. That should be in your owners manual. If the maintenance schedule in the owners manual shows the first oil change at 7500, then that is when to do it.


#3

I think Kia has 5w20, also check your owners manual to see if your driving fits the severe service schedule and see if you have to change your oil by time, every 6 months if you haven’t gone the mileage yet.


#4

Personally I wouldn’t go more than 5k between oil changes. If you go with the longer interval, don’t forget to check your oil level on a regular basis.

Ed B.


#5

I change oil at the interval specified by the car manufacturer. My mileage is almost all highway and I change oil at 7500 miles. No ill effects after 150,000 miles. I also use mineral oil of the same viscosity specified by the car manufacturer. If you want to change more often, that is up to you. If you drive in severe conditions, you should change oil at 5000 mile or less intervals.


#6

@Jman136
I Believe Most Car Manufacturers List A “Regular Driving” Maintenance Schedule And A “Severe Driving” Schedule.

I don’t know where you live, what the climate’s like, how many miles/year you drive, what kind of loads you carry, how fast or slow you go, how much idling you do, etcetera, but I’d just go ahead and use the severe use schedule.

Look at the parameters given there. Most of us fall into them at some time or another between oil changes.
CSA


#7

I have a 2013 Sonata with the same 2.4 DI engine and I am doing my own oil changes at 5K with synthetic oil. I also just bought a used Tucson with the same engine and plan to do the same. It might be a but of waste, but I sleep better this way.


#8

When I drove my 2002 Mitsubishi Eclipse second generation 2.4L on a regular city/ highway cycle I had the 5-30 mineral oil changed at 5,000 miles even though the manufacturer required 7,500 miles. My current 2010 Kia third generation 2.4L (post retirement) is driven less miles with more city than highway. I am now on a 6 month service schedule with 5-20 mineral oil.


#9

Ok, I’m sure the following are stupid questions, but I’m trying to learn as much as possible. Per the owners manual, it lists the following:

For severe driving (which I fall under) it’s 7,500 miles or 6 months

For normal driving it’s 7,500 miles or 12 months.

How come both driving conditions have the same mileage, but not the same interval periods?

Would regular oil actually go 7,500 miles without any problems? Would you all recommend upgrading to synthetic oil, or should I still with regular? The engine is a 2.4L GDI.

Anyway, I am just debating if the extra money for synthetic is worth it, or if I should just stick with regular and possibly hit 7,500 before an oil change.

Thanks much, guys!


#10

Time does effect oil life. The manual states 7500 miles and 6 months for your driving so where is the question. Have you considered asking the dealer what kind of oil they would use if they did the oil change ? Personally I have the dealer do my oil changes until the warranty expires just on the out side chance there is a problem. That way they have service records and I don’t have to worry about lost receipts.


#11

I just didn’t realize regular oil could go 7,500 miles. I thought only synthetic could safely.


#12

Regular oil can go 10k under good conditions. Oil is refined very well these days. Don’t go 10k on Dino but understand that you could.


#13

“For severe driving (which I fall under) it’s 7,500 miles or 6 months
For normal driving it’s 7,500 miles or 12 months.
How come both driving conditions have the same mileage, but not the same interval periods?
Would regular oil actually go 7,500 miles without any problems? Would you all recommend upgrading to synthetic oil, or should I still with regular? The engine is a 2.4L GDI.
Anyway, I am just debating if the extra money for synthetic is worth it, or if I should just stick with regular and possibly hit 7,500 before an oil change.”

EXACTLY!
I Run My Cars On Mobil-1 Extended Performance Full Synthetic And Change It At 5,000 Mile Intervals. That Takes All The Guess Work And Debating Out Of The Situation. I Change Oil Myself And It’s Relatively Inexpensive That Way. I Sleep Well, Too.

CSA


#14

If one desires a long and reliable life out of one’s car, it really makes no sense to use any schedule other than the “severe use” schedule. Err on the side of the engine.

I agree with CSA on other points as well. We’ve had lengthy threads debating the lifespan of oil. In truth, there are a great many variables including but not limited to the condition and age of the engine, the engine’s design, the driving environment (including weather), and the driving habits of the driver. It simply makes sense to change the oil and filters more often than you might need to. I too like 5,000 mile oil changes, even though new cars’ manuals might say otherwise. As CSA pointed out, it takes the guesswork out of it… and ensures that it’s changed often enough no matter the other variables.

One other thing I’ve always done is to ensure that the oil stays at or close to the FULL line on the dipstick. OK4450 has given us wisdom regarding the impact of good oil monitoring on timing chain life. I was apparently more wise than I realized.

I also do my own oil changes. Always have. I’ve gotten to the point where I get anxiety attacks when anyone else touches my car. :flushed: Unfortunately, the ol’ bod won’t allow me to do many things anymore. But I still do as much as I possibly can.


#15

The determining factors are the type of driving you do and the environmental conditions.

The only advantage that synthetic oil has over regular oil is that it can stand up to heat a little better without breaking down.

When it comes to contaminants and acidizing of the engine oil due to moisture synthetic is just as prone to that as regular oil.

If you live in damp or cold damp areas and if your driving involves a lot of short hop, city type then you would be well advised to change the oil far more often than 7500 miles. Oil changes are also time dependent so that should be factored in also.

Some more reading on the subject if you so desire.

http://www.azic.com/moisture-in-oils-the-three-headedbeast/


#16

Following the owner’s manual for engine oil specs and intervals will usually be a good bet. Be aware however that manufacturers have a conflict of interest, with a bias to increasing the service intervals as much as possible, b/c the car ratings organizations price out the “cost to own” figure of merit based on the owner’s manual service intervals. The manufacturer wants to sell as many cars as possible, so they tend to be biased in recommending longer service intervals. If your objective is to keep the car well maintained and serving you as long as possible, no harm done to decrease those intervals a bit. I’d go with 6 months or 5,000 miles, whichever came sooner, as the maximum I’d allow for the oil change interval, if I owned that vehicle. And I’d use exactly the oil the owner’s manual recommended. It used to be there was a good deal of leeway in the oil specs, but cars these days often use variable valve timing to increase the power and mpg specs, and VVT technology is very unforgiving about the oil specs.


#17

I’ve changed oil every 5000 miles since new when the oil meter says 50%. Suit yourself though but thats what I do.


#18

I guess CSA and I are the ones that sleep well!!

The problem I always see with severe driving conditions is that most of us fall under that. There is so much particulate material in the air where I am that my air filters are solid black after 15K miles. Put some of that in the engine oil and you are asking for trouble.

I have changed the oil on my 05 Camry at 3.5K mile intervals and now at 147K miles it does not burn any oil but once in a while has a puff of blue smoke on start-up, so some damage is done. I am sure if I had waited for the 7.5K miles per the manual, things would had been worse.


#19

@Jman136

7500 miles or 6 months . . . whichever comes first

If you drive only 4500 miles in 6 months, you still change it at 6 months

If you hit 7500 miles in 4 months, you change it at 4 months

Did I explain that well enough?

I will respectfully disagree with some of the others. In addition to the 0w20 fully synthetic, there is also 0w20 semi-synthetic. I can’t guarantee you’ll find it in every single parts store, but it’s out there


#20

@Jman136:
This question always brings out numerous differing opinions (and mine is no different). Our beliefs on oil changes are formed on our experiences and the unknowns with the industry’s move to longer oil change intervals over the past decade.

Millions of drivers each year follow the manufacturers’ recommendations for “normal driving” oil change intervals and end up getting long life from their engines. I would do the same.

If you’re really doing “severe driving”, (and I believe few do), then follow that schedule.

If you want weeks worth of reading material, do a past search on this forum for this topic. It’s been debated forever.