Liquid r134a charge into low side while running

cavalier
chevrolet
airconditioning
compressors

#1

How bad? How soon will I know if it resulted in a problem and how long before I can be relatively confident it didn’t? Was definitely a little low, but working before adding it, and seemed fine afterward, but I only ran it for about 15 mins total last night. Would any compressor damage be immediately obvious?


#2

Introducing liquid refrigerant into the low side can slug the compressor.

The compressor was designed to compress a gas.

The compressor can’t compress a liquid.

Wait and see if the compressor starts making noise.

Tester


#3

Yeah, I know all of those things. That is why I asked the question. Was hoping for a more useful answer than, “wait and see” since that is going to happen by default and goes without saying.


#4

What else ya gonna do?

Tester


#5

If you knew all those things, why did you do something you knew might damage the compressor?

Talk about shooting the messenger.


#6

That’s a good sign. If you added it slowly enough, it would be mostly vapor before reaching the compressor.


#7

Since you are already in “wait and see” why even ask


#8

If charging into a receiver -drier the liquid would almost certainly be vaporized before reaching the compressor. And My best guess is that the Chevrolet Cavalier had a receiver drier. When the low side port is on or near the compressor a problem is likely though.


#9

I’ve never seen a receiver/drier on the low pressure side on an AC system.

Tester


#10

The service port is about 2 feet from the compressor, where I live there is enough under hood heat to boil off the liquid before it enters the compressor.

That would be the accumulator on this car.


#11

Yes, @Nevada_545, and excuse me @Tester, the car’s drier is called an accumulator. And the charging port is on it.