Keep and repair my Honda Civic 99, or save for new car?

civic
honda
repair

#1

My 99 civic has not even 97k miles on it. but it does have some not soo pretty boddy damage. insurance says it would cost around $2,400 to repair all the damage. i can’t afford a new car now, and I don’t know when i would be able to afford a new car. but…i dont wanna spend money into a car that may die in a year.



how much longer is my car gonna live? it drives quite well now, but with some bumps once in a while when the auto transmission shifts gears. other than that, everything is good.



so, should i save for new car and not spend a dime on old, or fix up old…and make this thing last to 200k miles?


#2

It all depends on how it has been maintained. Have you kept up with all the maintenance in the owner’s manual? If so, there is no reason this car can’t make it to 200,000 miles.

No offense intended, but based on how you write (specifically “wanna” and “gonna”), I don’t think your social status will be hurt by driving a car that needs body work. Save the money you would have spent on body work and put it towards things like a timing belt and other maintenance.

If you haven’t already done so, you car might be due for a new timing belt and transmission service. When was the last time these items were done?


#3

Honda Civics are generaly good, long lasting cars IF they are maintained properly. And this maintenance rule applies across all makes and models.

Have you kept up with the maintenance required for your car? It is all listed in the Owner’s Manual.

None of us here could even begin to guess about its longevity, unless you share some of the maintenance info.

When is the timing belt due for replacement?


#4

I’ve currently got a 1989 Accord with 225k miles still going strong, if it’s been well maintained this car has years of service life left in it.


#5

i have indeed followed all of the recommended maintenance. i replaced the timing belt at 60k and am scheduled to do it again at 120k.

what about the bumps in the transmission? should i be concerned about that? though, i have to say, i drive a 2008 civic for work, and that too has some little bumps when the transmission changes gears. but i have also heard about other folk’s honda transmissions just dieing…but perhaps they werent changing the fluids as scheduled.


#6

I have a similar vintage Civic with similar miles(just over 97k actually) and haven’t really noticed and bumps in the transmission in mine


#7

As long as you have changed the automatic transmission fluid on time, I wouldn’t worry about little bumps when the transmission shifts. What you are experiencing is probably normal. If the transmission does have problems, there is nothing you can do to slow it’s decline, other than continue to maintain it properly. Just continue to take good car of it, and if the transmission dies, worry about it when it happens.


#8

have u had to replace anything mechanical?


#9

Nothing major, just a few suspension components (tie rods) and a CV axle. The motor and transmission itself have functioned flawlessly.


#10

Are you spending your $2,400 or is the insurance company giving you a $2,400 check for damage to the car?

If you keep the money and don’t repair the car you’ll have a down payment for a new one. But, your old '99 will look pretty shabby and some areas may start to rust because the repair wasn’t done. Then you’ll not maintain you shabby car and it will die a premature death.

No reason for a well maintained Honda Civic to die in a year unless you neglect it.


#11

im only getting about $500. ive already spent $750 to repair the mechanical damage and the worst body damage.

i had thought about just replacing the bumper…because of an ugly crack and fears it may fall off…but now i really dont think the thing is gonna fall off…unless i am hit pretty hard from behind.


#12

Start putting $100 a month toward a new car, get a separate savings account at your bank and have them take the $100 automatically each month. This will get you used to a monthly payment, albeit a small one.

Keep the '99 Civic maintained and on the road as long as you can. If you get 3 more years from it you’ll have over $3,000 in your new car account for a down payment. Keep it longer and you’ll have more. If you don’t neglect it the Civic could go another 5 or more years.


#13

engine is leaking oil. lost almost half its oil in 6 months.

repair guy said leak is inside, and would cost more than $1,000 to fix inner-engine leaks.

sold it yesterday. good bye, old friend.