Hybrid


#1

why is it i can go to all the car lots and can’t find a hybrid?I want a honda acord but i cant find one!arrrrrrrrrrh@###**&there hiding all the good cars so they can sell those gas hogs!!!


#2

After months of nothing selling, even hybrids were sitting on lots, you are experiencing the effects of the “Cash for Clunkers” boom. I play baseball on Sunday’s and one of the players runs a dealership (Kia) and he is sold out. He has one Kia Rio with no AC, no power anything, and manual trans. He had two and one sold. These are cars with no demand in normal times, but now everyone wants anything that gets good mpg so they can get the $4,500 benefit.

The hybrids will be back in stock in a few months. This guy said he has no prospects of gatting any Kia’s in any quantity in the immediate future. Everyone is scrambling trying to get cars to the dealer’s. Whoever does it best will make the most money for the duration of this program.


#3

You won’t find much of any Accord hybrids, they’re out of production. And nobody’s ‘hiding all the good cars’, they want to sell everything they have. It’s the end of the model year, models will be sold out.


#4

The regular Accord and 4 cyl Camry are very efficient and well worth consideration over a hybrid. Until hybrids go more than 50 miles on battery and at any speed, they are not worth the added expense in my opinion. I still don’t think that hybrids are ready for prime time for the average driver who wishes max. return for the $$$$$.


#5

The Accord hybrid is no longer in production. Good luck finding a used one. It didn’t sell in huge numbers.

As far as other hybrids are concerned, they’ve been in very high demand lately, especially considering the cash-for-clunkers program, and it’s possible the dealers have sold out. But they’ll be back in stock shortly.

I don’t think they’re “hiding all the good cars.” Dealers want to SELL cars, not hide them.


#6

Shootie, your various posts seem to indicate you want a very high mpg vehicle, but now you say you want an Accord hybrid, a sales failure because of its high cost and low mpgs. I don’t get it.


#7

The reason is high consumer demand for hybrids, coupled with (in certain cases) practical limitations on production.

My mom recently bought a '10 Ford Fusion hybrid. Even in the pre-C4C marketplace, these cars were being sold right at list, and none were sitting long on the lot. In this case, in addition to demand, there was a practical limitation on production due to the battery sub-contractor having maxed output.

If you were interested in the Accord hybrid, look at the Fusion hybrid. Car+Driver recently rated it tops out of its “mid-sized hybrid” test (Fusion, Altima, Camry Malibu), mostly on driving satisfaction. From personal experience, it handles well (just like std. Fusions/Mazda 6), and will get you an honest 39MPG mixed driving.


#8

The Accord hybrid was made for increasing performance and it had lower mpg than the regular Accord V6. Consider the Fusion and Camry Hybrids as possible midsize hybrid car choices.


#9

In some strange way, the OP’s self-contradictory posts remind me of Yogi Berra’s comment about a restaurant that was recommended to him.

Yogi said, “Nobody goes there anymore because it’s too crowded!”!


#10

Consumer Reports just named the Fusion–including the hybrid model–as “the best domestically-made sedan”.


#11

“The Accord hybrid was made for increasing performance and it had lower mpg than the regular Accord V6.”

I disagree on both counts. The 2005 Honda Accord V6 with an automatic gets EPA 19/28 MPG. The Accord Hybrid that year gets EPA 25/33 MPG. I was looking at Accords that year, and Honda marketed the Accord hybrid as a fuel saving car. But the fuel savings was small compared to the cost of the hybrid, even over the EX V6; that’s what I bought. I figured it would take 10 years to make up the difference. But you are right about it having higher performance. All the car mags gushed over the extra power.