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How long should I warm up my 2017 Hyundai Elantra?

How long should I wait to Warming Up my car ? , And Is there a manual from Hyundai to tell me how long it is ?

No offence , but warming up a vehicle is a long past idea . All you need to do is start the vehicle let it run for a few seconds and drive of in a sensible way . No hard acceleration for a few miles and you will be fine. Modern vehicles actually get to operating temps under motion better.

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Yes, there is a manual for your car. It is called the “Owners Manual”, usually found in the glove box.
As far as warming up, I prefer to wait until the RPMs drop to a thousand, about 30-60 seconds, but that is my own personal ‘ism’.

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My car manual say " • It is best to maintain a moderate
engine speed until the vehicle engine
comes up to normal operating temperature. Avoid harsh or abrupt
acceleration or deceleration while
the engine is still cold." now, How many seconds should I wait to start moving ?

I start car , fasten seat belt , check surrounding area for untethered children then back out of drive . Or I start vehicle and then clear windows of snow or frost then go. You are over thinking this .

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I personal preference is to wait until RPMs drop to 1000 or less.
Time will vary with outside temperature, usually less than a minute.
I start my car, then buckle my seatbelt, make any adjustments to sound system and HVAC controls that might be necessary. By then the car is usually ready to go.

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I was told by the experts(Click and Clack) that modern cars no longer require warm ups. They haven’t steered me wrong yet. (rest in peace, Tommy. I really miss your wonderful laugh and sense of humor)

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abodyabody5111_148855:

  • If you want to get into a warm car in cold weather, or if you want to warm it to defrost the windows, then warm it as long as you wish. You will do it no harm. You will never notice any difference in engine wear.
  • If you want to drive off quickly after a start, then:
    – In cold temps, let it idle for 30 seconds and then drive easy for the first few minutes.
    – In moderate temps, drive immediately and try to go easy for the first few minutes.
  • Idling for a long time only waste a little gas. Some states have idling laws. Most say no more than 5 minutes.

Agree! With today’s synthetic oils you get the oil up to the valve gear within 15 seconds. If you have to park outside on sub-zero weather, I would take a little longer, mostly to clear the windows so you can see out.

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I think you can just get in and go however you like without much risk of any problems developing. If it was super-cold, might may sense to drive a little more gingerly for a few minutes. My method is to start the engine, then go back inside to get whatever I’ve forgotten that day. So the net result is I idle the engine for a minute or two before driving away. 27 year old vehicle, 200K miles, so it must be working somewhat. Idling a little longer isn’t going to hurt anything other than having to pay for a little more gasoline, and the emissions it causes.

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There is an exception to this. If you have to go up a steep hill or get onto an expressway soon after starting. For most people that wouldn’t apply but if it did apply then that would be like starting your car cold and immediately accelerating hard which of course Tom and Ray said are no-no’s.

Quite Right. Years ago I lived in a large city and had an apartment one block from the freeway. Going to work in the morning I had to enter the freeway and immediately go 65 mph. At that time I had to park outside as I was waiting for an underground stall to be assigned.

I took some time to warm the engine up a little to avoid the punishment of the freeway speed.

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Modern vehicles with automatic transmissions are engineered to keep revs as low as possible for gas mileage gains. So it’s possible to go 55 mph at 2,000 rpm which is not going to hurt an engine that’s just warming up. But as you say, safely accelerating up an on-ramp and then going 65 mph caused you to find a different strategy.

That is exactly what I do with my 2010 Kia Forte except it has never taken more than 30 seconds.