Generic Oil


#1

Is Generic car oil is as good as name brand oil such as Castro, Penzoil? What is the difference between 10W30, and 10W40?


#2

As long as the oil container states that it meets the API specifications that your engine requires, then there is essentially no difference from one brand to another.

However, I would exercise caution on one of those brands that you mentioned, namely Castro. I wouldn’t trust Fidel as far as I could throw him, and I definitely wouldn’t buy a product marketed by him.

;-))


#3

Do you suppose he meant Castrol?


#4

“As long as the oil container states that it meets the API specifications that your engine requires, then there is essentially no difference from one brand to another.”

Well, I would agree that all this oil meets the minimum requirements for the car, but that does not necessarily mean “essentially no difference.” That’s sorta like saying that when I buy food, any steak that has FDA approval is essentially the same. IMHO, the price difference between the cheapest and most expensive oil is small enough that there is no reason to use the cheap stuff.


#5

The designations 10W30 and 10W40 refer to the weight, or the viscosity at various temperatures. Oil thins at high temperatures. 10W40 maintains its viscosity at high temperatures better than 10W30.

Most modern cars do quite well with 10W30 the year round. In very cold winter climates, a thinner oil is preferred. Some motorists in very hot climates use 10W30 in winter but traditionally switch to 10W40 for summer. In general, the owner’s manual for your vehicle will specify your engine’s oil requirements.


#6

Yes, generic oil is just as good as “brand name” oil, and it saves you money.

The oil viscosity designations (10W30, or 10W40, etc.) tell you how the oil will perform at extreme temperatures.

A 10W30 oil will perform as a 10W oil at low temperatures and as a 30W oil at high temps.

Don’t worry about this. Use the oil recommended in your owner’s manual.


#7

Use the oil that meets spec and weight for your vehicle, hopefully listed in manual or on oil cap(sometimes).

Much more important than brand is changing it on a timing basis according to manual(typically severe schedule). Using a premium brand name and stretching oil changes/neglecting oil level will lead to the early demise of an engine.


#8

RE: Viscosity

To add another tidbit, the first number is rated at 0 degrees C, while the 2nd number is rated at 100 degrees C.

So a 10W30 or 10W40 oil will have the same “pour” characteristics at 0 degrees C as a 10W oil.
A 10W30 oil will have the same “pour” characteristics at 100 degrees C as a 30W oil.


#9

As long as it meets API specs is correct, just as everyone has posted. If you must know the brand or manufacturer just ask. Example; there is a brand in MO. & IL. called Rockhill. It’s made by valvoline. Box stores most likely won’t know but Big A, NAPA, etc. will


#10

If it is as good as Pennzoil, some people would not buy it. People do buy it all the time at Sam’s Club. I seen it wit me own two eyes. I don’t know where the good stuff comes from. I used the synthetic oil from Wal-Mart once at about $13 for a five quart can. I didn’t like the smell of it, so I switched to Castrol Syntec for $10 more.


#11

That’s sorta like saying that when I buy food, any steak that has FDA approval is essentially the same. IMHO, the price difference between the cheapest and most expensive oil is small enough that there is no reason to use the cheap stuff.

I like your steak analogy. I agree why buy the cheap stuff to save penny’s. Look for sales or buy at the discount warehouses. I buy Mobil-1 at BJ’s for under $4/qt. The cheap synthetic oil at Wallmart is $4/qt.


#12

Castrol… That’s what my grandmother used to give her kids to keep them “running smoothly”…


#13

hahahahaha PDV, what would we do without you.


#14

In case you’re still reading our foolishness, www.carbibles.com has a great primer on oils. I recommend a visit.


#15

Stay tuned; the best is yet to appear.