Ford Taurus 2004 Spark Plug Change


#1

Hello,

I have a Ford Taurus 2004 and would like to change its Spark Plug. I am looking for instructions for doing so as 3 of the spark plugs at the back of the engine are under the manifold air-intake. I am looking for step by step instructions of how to reach to the spark plugs to the back.

Best regards,
Mansour


#2

Click on the link for instructions. You have to remove the intake manifold and coil packs, not to mention a bunch of other stuff that is in the way. If you are doing this yourself because a mechanic quoted a high price, now you know why.


#3

Do you have the DOHC 24 valve Duratec 3.0L engine, or the more common SFI 12 valve Vulcan 3.0L engine.

If the latter, you may not need to remove the manifold. I don’t recall needing to.


#4

I have DOHC 24v. I need preferably a video taking me through the procedure. One side question, I am pretty sure that spark plugs are the original ones coming from the factory. At what mileage should they be changed?


#5

Thank you very much for the great info. :slight_smile: I was wondering if there is a video also to take me through the procedure.

Clearly Ford made a very questionable design.

I wish three was a way to avoid removing the Intake Manifold: I knew a ford mechanic suggesting that there was by somehow reaching to the rear spark plugs. Any thoughts on this?

Best regards,
Mansour


#6

The information that @jtsanders gave you is essentially a cut-and-paste of the factory procedure to remove the upper intake. It actually contains all you need, including torque specs. Make absolutely sure to replace those gaskets. Don’t try to save money and reuse them. It’s not worth it. they’re already compressed and might not seal correctly a second time, in which case you might have a check engine light and the accompanying lean codes

My thoughts as to doing the plugs without removing the upper intake . . . don’t take this approach. You might wind up damaging something

BTW . . . this is not “a very questionable design” on Ford’s part

On many transverse V6 engines, you have to remove the upper intake to do the plugs. Standard procedure. It’s not as big of ordeal as it may initially seem to be

Also, use the plugs specifically called for, in the owner’s manual. With the amount of work required, it’s not worth using some other brand, and maybe your engine “doesn’t like them”

Why don’t you check youtube . . . I wouldn’t be surprised if some guy filmed the whole procedure and uploaded it


#7

U remove the panel/cowl by the wipers. Worked like a charm on my 01. Easy to find online.


#8

Hello,

Thank you for all the replies. I checked with a mechanic and he was the second person who told me that the way to remove the rear spark plugs is not by removal of the air intake (The first person was Ford authorized mechanic). He said that it is to reach them by a flexible wrench only.

I am very thankful that you have provided the means to remove the air intake in order to reach to the spark plugs. I am not debating if this is the way to remove the air intake. I was wondering if anyone in the community can check Ford’s approach in replacement of the rear spark plugs and if the removal of the air intake is what Ford suggest - I have checked Haynes it suggests removal of air intake.

I am including an image under the hood.

Best regards,
Mansour


#9

The factory service procedure is to remove the upper intake to replace the spark plugs and coils. But that doesn’t mean you should do it that way. The fewer things you remove or disturb to do a job, the fewer things you have that can go wrong, not get sealed up, etc.

There’s no need to remove the intake or the cowl. Simply reach back there and do it. It will be by feel only and you may need some tools you don’t have, but with the proper tools it’s a 15 minute job.


#10

If OP is a newbie diy’er, suggest to do it the way the service manual says. It may take longer and add some add’l cost, but it will make the job easier and you’ll be less likely to break off a spark plug or cross thread, which might require a tow to a machine shop to repair and yield a much higher bill. My philosopy as an occasional diy’er is to remove more than what the FSM says to remove, providing that it is stuff straightforward to remove.