Confused between used and new!

Hello everyone , last week i bought 2018 hyundai tucson SEL used has 13k miles on it , the price was 17k , today i got a call from one of hyundai dealers i was in contact with him before saying that they have New 2019 tucson SEL for 19k final price ofcourse plus the state tax and stuff , now i feel like i did a mistake buying used what should i do now ?? And how possible the used one & new one have the same price !!! I was thinking i saved couple thousands now i feel like i messed up whats your advices ??:roll_eyes:

Your 2018 SEL more than likely has more optional equipment, and the 2019 has just the basic SEL package.

I personally would stay with the 2018 and be happy.

Trying to trade/sell/giveback the 2018 is going to cost you a few thousand dollars anyway.

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You are right the 2019 is basic and doesn’t have alot of stuff , but if you were in my place would you buy used or new in general ??

I’ve only bought 1 new vehicle in my life, that was in 1992, all others were anywhere from 3 to 7 years old.

I always felt I get more for my money buying used.

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It depends on your financial position. If you’re financially comfortable and you have the money saved, then it’s reasonable to treat yourself to a new car. If not, then the responsible thing to do is to buy a used car. For most people, a car that’s around three years old is generally the best value in terms of offering good reliability and remaining life for the price.

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I have only purchased one new vehicle in my life, a 2004 Toyota Corolla, and the only reason I bought new was because the dealer was willing to special order it with the equipment that I wanted. Now that all cars come with a boatload of equipment and features that I don’t want, I see no reason to buy new ever again.

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You can look online and see what that 2019 has compared to your 2018 . But you will really take a hit if you trade this soon .

Frankly we only buy new because we keep them for quite a while .

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The 2019 may be the bottom of the line. Some dealers advertise these models and may not even have them in stock. In the case of the OP, it may be a bait and switch. When the OP comes in, the salesperson may try to switch the OP to a more expensive model. I am suspicious of this because the car was purchased less than a week ago. A good salesperson wouldn’t call a week after the purchase and try to get you to trade. Undoubtedly, the 2018 still has warranty at 13,000 miles.
My suggestion to the OP: Look at this situation as if you are playing euchre. “A card laid is a card played”. Stick with the purchase you made.

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Yep, old sales trick is to offer a super cheap version, get you in, then show why you want a much ‘better’ version. I’d bet that super cheap one might not even be available. Stick with what you have, don’t look back.

As for me, I buy new, keep them 10-15 years.

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Ah, they don’t. The new one looks to be $2k more than what you paid.

It appears you did save a couple thousand.

It’s water under the bridge. You’d spend a big chunk of the $2k savings in the exchange at this point so no sense looking back. One of the reasons I stop looking right after I buy something. Too easy to feel remorse if a seemingly better deal comes along…

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Thanks everyone for the great advices i appreciate it

It really doesn’t matter which was the better choice, you already made it. No dealer is going to take your 2018 and give you a new 2019 at the same price you were quoted. Most decisions in life are like that,you just make them with the best information you have at the time and move on.

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Well I kind of did the same thing I bought a 2016 Sienna certified with a 12 month 12,000 mile warranty vehicle had 14,000 miles on it and it was about 4 Grand less than a new one. I talked to a young lady working in the bank about the vehicle, she’s my goddaughter, her take on it was if you buy a new one you’ll get very low finance rate like .9 or 1.9, where buying a used one you pay a lot more in interest rate. She thought the difference in the percentage rate would more than make up the difference in price between the two. So whenever she buys a new car she buys a new car not a used one. I love the car I bought thought I had a very good deal until the bank deal

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Dealers love to sell 1 and 2 year old cars because they can sometimes make more money than on a new one. Factories manage their inventories by giving rebates to the dealer. They don’t give rebates on used cars. Often the rebate varies between leasing and buying, and may vary by region.
An example is a 2019 Acura MDX. There is currently a $6,000 plus rebate, or cash on the hood, on a lease, plus maybe a $1500 loyalty/conquest rebate, and a $2,000 plus discount. If a used 2018 is $7000 less than a MSRP , is it a deal?. NO
The point is, don’t assume a lightly used vehicle is a better deal than a new one. A one year old car is most likely an ex rental. Should it sell for the same amount as a privately owned car? Why would an individual trade in a 1 year old car with 13,000 mile?. All that is avoided if you buy new.

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I found similar things when I looked at trucks a few years ago. A 2012 supercab f150 4wd with 14k miles was only about $4k less than a 2013 full crewcab f150 4wd. They were optioned very similarly. And the price difference between a supercab and crew cab comparing new trucks was about $4k. So, I would’ve saved pretty much nothing buying the used truck. Of course these were two different dealerships, but it shows that you can often get a new vehicle for about the same price as a 1 or 2 year old vehicle with low miles. They seem to depreciate faster for the buyer than they do the dealerships…

I bought the new one and have since traded it. I’d prefer to get a lower optioned brand new vehicle vs buying a higher trim package used vehicle, also. Of course both of the vehicles I now drive are 14 years old. So I hope the suv I got my wife when we traded off my new truck will last. It’s my turn to get the new one again next time.

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I guess i didn’t understand that before next time i gonna buy new too

In late spring of 2010, I was in the market for a new minivan. It just happened that the 2011 Toyota Sienna minivans were already available. The dealer had both 2010 and 2011 Siennas. The difference in price to drive away in a 2011 was so slight, I bought the 2011 model.
In the fall of 2017, I had the 2011 at the dealer for service work. We had planned to sell it to our son at some point. We went into the showroom and my wife asked if the 2018 Siennas were available. The salesman said that the 2018 wasn’t available yet, but that they had good deals on the 2017 models. When I asked “How good?” it turned out that the dealer was taking $5000 off the sticker price. With very little negotiation, we came out with what I thought was a very good price. In both the case of the 2011 and the 2017, these were cash deals.

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I haven’t kept up on this discussion but I’ll just add that my credit union has the new rate and also applies to used up to I think three years old. After that it’s a higher rate. Every bank is different though. I prefer new because I don’t like shopping for cars or worrying about what the previous owner did for maintenance and like to choose what I want. It all comes out in the wash though and doesn’t really matter if you got something you like at a reasonable cost. The depreciation thing is just funny money and evens out over four or five years. Some people like to shop and shop looking for just the right car and then negotiate negotiate for just the right price, but I don’t. Bottom line, long run, doesn’t matter much if you are happy. Not much difference in model years anymore since the same style runs about five years or more. Not like the old days.

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Believe it when you see it. The Hyundai web site shows the Tucson SEL starting at $25,600, there is a limited time discount of $3,000 that lowers the price to $22,600. The dealer would have to discount the vehicle another $3,600 to meet that price which doesn’t seem likely. The lowest priced Tucson SEL at my nearest dealer is $22,525 with discounts.

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I might be wrong, but the 2018 SEL has the 2.0 Nu engine which is pretty decent. The 2019 probably has the 2.4 Theta engine that has been prone to bearing failures. Seems like nobody, including Hyundai, is not sure if the newer engines on these are any better.
Keep the 2018.

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