Chrome Wheels

wheels
#1

Is it true that chrome wheels are subject to corrosion, causing loss of tire air? This is what I’ve been told is the problem with one of my wheels/tires. Can I look forward to replacing all of my chrome wheels because of this? What other options do I have? I love my chrome wheels!

#2

Some alloy wheels leak air, yes. One of my cars has two leaking alloy wheels.

I just remember to check the tire pressures often and correct them when they get low. Much less expensive than replacing the wheels.

#3

I too love chrome wheels.

Yes, the are subject to rusting which can affect the abaility of the beading edge to seal and cause leak problems. New rims or rechroming are the only real solutions.

Alloy rims can also corrode and cause slow leaks through porosity in the metal itself. This used to be a real problem when manufacturers started using them as original equipment, especially with the Ford rims, but I think the rim manufacturers have conquered the problem.

I don’t know for sure, but I think they’re using only anti-gravity casting now. It’s a process where the “lost wax” molds are filled from the bottom from a large adjoining tank with the connection above the tank bottom. That eliminates slag, which stays floating on the feed tank, heavy inclusions, which sink to the bottom of the feed tank and stay there, and voids (occlusions) in the product, as the air matriculates out the top as the cavity fills taking everything but the casting plaster with it. It’s a far superior casting method.

#4

Replacing won’t be necessary just more cleaning when its time to replace tires,it’s hard to get “tire guys” to do the rim clean-up,they seem to be interested in speed.

#5

When folks first started getting their alloys chromed, I heard that they would eventually peel because of the different expansion between aluminum and chromium. Are yours factory or aftermarket? Which brand?

#6

This is a common problem with chrysler rims. The chrome peeling starts and doesn’t stop. It usually starts on the inside and works its way all the way around to the mounting surfaces of the rim causing pressure loss. I have heard of people “redipping” them. But usually people replace them.

#7

Like everything else there are good and there are bad. If you buy cheap, that is what you get. If you buy really good (cost listed at 10X usual OEM cost, then you likely will get good.

#8

They are factory, on a Pontiac Grand Am GT. Since the tire people cleaned the wheel off better when I was in last time, it seems to have helped the air loss problem. So until the problem becomes a really big issue, I’m going to wait it out, and have the wheels cleaned/brushed as necessary.

#9

They just need more care.

For cleaning…Get a steel wool pad. Cleans them up nice. Follow up with a wax.