Car will not start after I went through water


#1

We had a terrible storm two days ago. Driving home from work and went through some water. The car didn’t make it through the water, but stalled, and water started to come into the car.

Had the car towed to my house the next day, however it will not start for nothing. Need help



The storm was terrible, tornado’s, and massive rain down pour and hail, the size of golf balls, and blackout’s in our town.

The car will not make sound whatsoever when I try to start it. I’ve took some parts off the car, and water just pours out of these parts


#2

Where is your air intake located? If you got water in your intake, your car may have hydro-locked on you? Does not bode well. Check your oil. If it appears cloudy, you got water in your engine. I’m not sure if there’s anything you can do to fix this besides rebuilding or replacing your engine. I don’t know, but maybe your insurance might cover this.


#3

Thanks for the quick response. I didn’t think to check the oil. I’ll do that now, before taking more parts apart.


#4

Water and electricity do not mix. Starters hate water. If you have water coming out of engine parts where they do not belong, chances are this car should be considered flood damaged. Even if you get it running again, you’ll be facing a tough time with all kinds of electrical bugs due to hidden water damage. The sensors and ECM connectors are most likely compromised, and very sensitive to corrosion. I’d consider buying a new car, and dumping this lemon NOW.


#5

If you remove all spark plugs and crank the engine, the water will spray out of the cylinders. When it stops spraying, put the plugs back in and change the oil. Then start it.


#6

Hi, the car will only make a click sound when I turn the key.
Are you saying just take the spark plugs out anyway and try to start the car, even if it just make a click sound.
I just want to be sure


#7

Yes. This will not allow the engine to start, but it will expel much of the water from the cylinders–IF the engine actually turns over.

From your description, I fear that the engine has been hydrolocked, which would mean extensive repairs or a new engine. But, maybe you will luck out. Begin by doing what pleasedodgevan suggested.


#8

Thanks for the quick reply. I will try that


#9

If you sell this car to anyone you need to tell them all about the swim your car took. But no one who knows about cars wants a swimmer.If your car is lo-tech (60sVW) it could survive. But if its loaded with electronics and they all got wet,bad day.


#10

The problem (or so I’ve heard) with water on electronics is the minerals left behind after the water evaporates. I’ve wondered, would a good soak (or 2 or 3) in distilled water “fix” this or possibly help?


#11

I’ve tried everything, however nothing will work. Should I just take it to the shop now, and will the insurance cover this.


#12

I’ve tried everything, however nothing will work. Should I just take it to the shop now, and will the insurance cover this.

No you call the insurance company first and follow their instructions. They may not pay for repairs done prior to their authorization.


#13

Additional information:
After weeks of car rental, my insurance finally called and told me that they would only give me $500 for the car.
I just said no and hung up the phone.
Two days later they called and told that that they had many vehicles in my area that had flood/water damage and they will auction the car off. I will receive the monies from the car.
I told them, I would just like blue book value/ fair offer for my claim, and you can sell the car after I receive my claim check.
What’s going on, the insurance company doesn’t want to give me anything.
What can I do?
Why would they want to sell this car in an auction, and who would buy it.
I just want my claim check, so I can buy another car.
It’s been like a month now.


#14

Two pieces of vital information are missing here:

  1. Vehicle details-make, model, year, mileage, condition before the submarine imitation.
  2. Type of insurance coverage and deductible.