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'Breath Tests Aim to Stop Drunk Driving. Can We Trust the Results?'

Please stop posting NY Times articles

I know there’s ways to read the articles without subscribing . . .

But I’m not going to the trouble

It’s too bad . . . because the topic of discussion seems like an interesting one

YOUR loss . . . as it means one more regular who won’t be contributing to this particular discussion

And to anybody well-meaning who’s thinking of telling me how to circumvent the subscription requirement, please don’t bother. Thanks but no thanks.

My objection is to the fact that Troll is posting articles that require extra effort to read

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I guess Random means well but I don’t think I am the only one that finds it irritating . If I want to read the New York Times I am perfectly able to find it by my self.

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@RandomTroll

You certainly picked an apt screen name :+1:

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It almost seems as if Troll is one of those folks that is getting paid for click throughs by the NY Times…

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Yeah they lie too. If I want to read the NYT all I have to do is read the Minneapolis paper. Half the articles are re-prints. It’d be two pages long if the left out NYT, WaPo, AP, and NPR. Then the question is from what unknown source did it really originate from?

At any rate without getting into copyright issues, you can summarize the article in a few lines and then post a link for those that want to wade into it. IMHO anyway.

It’s a shame that the Minneapolis paper can’t afford to hire reporters anymore. That’s happening here, too. Just this week I started seeing articles in the Baltimore Sun attributed to the Washington Post. That’s desperation, considering that the Post is a competitor in a lot of the Sun’s territory. This is especially concerning given that the Sun is part of Tribune Publishing. In any case, if the Minneapolis paper eliminates all those reliable sources you mentioned, where will they get believable news from?

That’s the point, they really don’t anymore. I buy a copy every Sunday but it’s hardly worth the $2.50 anymore. Couple of good columns sometimes. Last week one of their folks wrote a piece on the problems farmers were having due to the hot drier weather. Hee hee. Problem is Minnesota has been cold and wet this year. Standing water all over the fields and a late Spring. I remember a year like this about 20 years ago. Some couldn’t even get crops in. So reality was the exact opposite. Maybe they were talking about Oklahoma or some place but not Minnesota. Ten years ago on December 1 we were out building a deck in shirt sleeves but not this year-I’m pretty much done outside-too cold.

And I used up all my free reads for Brainerd Dispatch and WAPO also. I might decide to pay for one or 2, buds on facebook seem pretty good at letting me read headlines and getting a brief synopsis. I often get more info from the comments rather than the article itself. Some sites (to keep it car related) are less reputable than some used car purchases we have seen.

There you go mistaking weather for climate again. We normally get a little over 40 inches of rain each year, but last year we got a little over 80 inches. Weather or climate? At this point, I’d say mostly weather, but we’ll see. Wetter in the Midwest during fall seems to be the new normal according to research at Iowa State University. You seem to be experiencing climate change and don’t recognize it.

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Re climate and weather, Somewhere long ago someone noted how Easter Island’s inhabitants destroyed their entire world due to their mindless obsession with honoring some supernatural spirit of some sort. Apparently that observation has been observed and noted many times in recent decades but few wish to accept that WE don’t need to have an absolute, scientifically proven and certain determination that there is a link between carbon and climate change or sulfur dioxide and acid rain/deforestation, etc. Why is it so difficult to accept that we cannot pave over or plow over and plant crops on every acre of land from coast to coast? Before the traffic on I-95 requires 8 lanes in each direction someone should recognize the need for some other solution to the urban/suburban sprawl.Will America’s legacy be that ten thousand years from now archeologists will dig up and attempt to determine what deity was being honored and worshiped with all the signs lined up in long rows?

Soylent Greeen, Metropolis, 1984, so many poignant prophesies and so many deaf ears. But what does a red neck who barely finished high school in Mississippi know?

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I didn’t like Charlton Heston the man . . .

But I did like some of the roles he played on the screen

In my opinion, Soylent Green was one of his better roles

I’m also a big Edward G. Robinson fan, by the way; even though this was one of his last roles, I felt it was memorable

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  1. I think the fact that it’s an issue at all matters.
  2. I don’t subscribe. I can even read them at the public library, so it isn’t some special effect of my computer. If nothing else, most people can right-click on the link, save the article, read that copy.
    Here’s the entire text:
    More than 1 million people a year are arrested for drunk driving and most are asked to blow into a breath test machine to see how impaired they might be. The devices, among the most widely used forensic tools in law enforcement, generate numbers that can all but guarantee a driver’s conviction and punishment. In most states, if you refuse the test, you lose your license.


    For months, The New York Times has been investigating problems with the technology used to make these cases. Our reporters found that tens of thousands of breath tests in more than a dozen states have been thrown out by judges. What does it mean if we can’t trust a tool hailed as accurate to the third decimal point?

Excuses, excuses . . .

stop posting articles that require us to go unreasonable lengths to read them

Too much work . . .

It’s a shame, really, because I won’t be contributing to this discussion

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/03/business/drunk-driving-breathalyzer.html
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/03/business/breathalyzer-investigation-takeaways.html