Bleed new caliper,1997 Grand Caravan

dodge
grandcaravan

#1

I installed a new caliper on my 1997 Grand Caravan. Then I tried to bleed the brake line. There appears to be no bleeder valve but only a single screw with a hole in the end. There appears to be no valve to bleed the air. How do I bleed the air out of the caliper?


#2

@LeRoy

That “single screw with a hole in the end” is the bleeder


#3

??? You are describing the bleeder screw.

I don’t mean to offend anyone here, but brakes are the most vital safety component on a car, for you and for anyone on the road around you. If you don’t understand how to properly repair your brakes please don’t attempt to do it yourself.


#4

Gotta agree with the above. Just installed new pads and rotors and exchanged brake fluid. My back is sore.

Bleeding is a two person job without bleeding equipment. Attach a plastic tube to the bleeder screw with the other end in a bottle with brake fluid in. Open the bleeder while the other person pushes down on the pedal and holds. Close bleeder valve, then brake pedal is released. Repeat a couple dozen times until no air bubbles come through the hose making sure to keep the resevoir filled. A repair manual is a handy thing to have.


#5

@db4690, @asemaster, @Bing Thanks for the help. I never understood how that was a valve since it looks like it would unscrew the whole thing. I am going to have to take it all apart sometime and see how it works! I don’t have to completely understand brakes, I have the world’s finest experts to consult! My wife is my assistant, has been assisting for years! The brakes work fine!


#6

Maybe not that fine! I replaced shoes on both front discs. I replaced the left front caliper. The brakes work perfectly but the left rim is hotter than the right rim! What should I do to correct it or will it cool down when it breaks in?


#7
The brakes work perfectly but the left rim is hotter than the right rim!

If one rim is hotter…it’s usually a sign that the caliper on that wheel is sticking.


#8

It could also be a sign that the rubber flexible brake hose leading to the caliper has collapsed internally. For a car that’s 16+ years old, I’d definitely replace both front brake hoses.


#9

@MikelnNH The left caliper is the one I replaced last weekend, probably not sticking. I thought the one I replaced was sticking since that lining had more wear.
@JoeMario I never heard of that. I am just a weekend mechanic but wouldn’t that restrict the flow and lower the movement of the lining? I will replace the hoses.


#10

As those rubber brake lines age, their inner walls can collapse. When they do, they will often behave like a reed valve - allowing fluid movement only one way (to the caliper) and not in reverse (where a very small movement is needed to ease off the pressure on the caliper & pads).

I’ve had to replace many, as have others on this board. You can find lots more info on it by doing a search for “collapsed flexible brake hose”.


#11

@JoeMario I replaced the left front flexible brake hose and all is well! Thanks to everybody for all the help!