Are LED headlights worthexpen$e?


#1

State Patrol trooper suggests replacing high beam lamps with LEDs.
During emergency blood platelet transports the lamps are alternately flashed which can cause them to burn out sooner.
But good high beams are needed for revealing deer and elk. Saw four blood spots on the road en route to a hospital at 3 a.m. this morning.

Have found no parts stores which sell LED headlight lamps.
If on line only, that make me suspicious.

Thank you.


#2

It is not that simple of a task… LED Headlights are a totally different animal all together… Same thing with HID type… The actual headlight itself is completely different…we arent talking about going to the store and changing out a bulb here. Be prepared to exercise that wallet as well.

Blackbird


#3

Hey here’s an idea - SLOW DOWN


#4

Thank you. The on line source claims just remove the old lamp capsules (ours are 9005) and insert the new. (The existing HID low beam lamps will not be touched.)
For high beams, do the HID low beams stay on and the 9005s turn on ?
Our previous vehicles had dual-filament low beam bulbs. Low beam filament turned off and the “high beam” filament illuminated with the separate high beam’s filament.


#5
Hey here's an idea - SLOW DOWN

Tell that to hospital ORs who call and say "Speed it up."
After all, 80 mph in a 75 mph zone is too fast.
The emergencyehicle’s flashing headlights encourage drivers to change lanes out of lane 1 (where often they are traveling 60 to 65 in the 75 zone) way ahead, so they can do lane changes un rushed.
Then no siren noise pollution is needed!


#6

Sorry -still not buying it. There is no way a hospital will take the liability when you crash and kill someone because you are driving recklessly.


#7
Sorry -still not buying it. There is no way a hospital will take the liability when you crash and kill someone because you are driving recklessly.

Here’s a concept. Don’t drive recklessly!
Of course, Never drive over 75 mph! Oh, some states have 80 mph speed limits.

Years ago, Montana had no speed limit on some stretches of I-94 and I-90.
It was wonderful! There was a problem if you discern that 95 mph is safe but a law enforcement officer thinks not, you could get a ticket.
Being a Greenie and Registered Tree Hugger, I stayed at lower speeds anyway to savexpen$ive gas and pollute less. But many traveled in excess of 100 mph.


#8

The DOT approved direct bulb replacements are insanely expensive, and there isn’t enough real-world use data yet to tell whether or not a) they’re better than stock and b) they last long enough to justify the price.

Depending on the bulbs you require you could be spending $200 - even more if you have separate high and low beam housings.


#9

First off you’ve admitted here many times you drive at or above 100mph in a vehicle that isn’t designed to drive that fast. Second you’ve also admitted here that you drastically overinflate your tires. Third - you’re the only person I ever heard of that says they deliver blood at reckless speeds. I have a very hard time believing a hospital doesn’t have a handle on their blood supply and constantly runs out. Fourth - hasn’t you state heard of Helicopters???


#10

I’m confused. If you need good high-beam visibility, why would you want them turning on and off? Shouldn’t something else flash instead so that you can keep your headlights on continuously?


#11

Thank you. This on line retailer says $79 for two 9005 equivalent.
They have external heat sinks. Some have a built-in fan at the rear of each lamp.
There may be a clearance problem behind the lamp fixture.

The low beam is HID through its own lamp assembly.
The high beam is a separate reflector into which the 9005 inserts and locks.


#12

No, it isn’t worth upgrading. If you’re outdriving your headlights, slow down. Then, when you get home, replace the bulbs with new ones (incandescent bulbs, including quartz-halogen), degrade with use. Fresh bulbs can make a big difference.

Be aware also that Sylvania sells headlight bulbs in five different grades, Silverstar Untra being the brightest. That’s what I use, and it really does make a clear difference. The tradeoff is that the Ultras have shorter operating lives. And, of course, the cost. A pair of Silverstar Ultras for my car costs about $50. To me it’s an investment in safety, well worth it. You can get something in between the OEM replacements and the Ultras for considerably less. You can buy them all at any parts store.


#13
First off you've admitted here many times you drive at or above 100mph in a vehicle that isn't designed to drive that fast. Second you've also admitted here that you drastically overinflate your tires. Third - you're the only person I ever heard of that says they deliver blood at reckless speeds. I have a very hard time believing a hospital doesn't have a handle on their blood supply and constantly runs out. Fourth - hasn't you state heard of Helicopters???

Helicopters would be best by far! Straight line directly to the hospital.
But many times they cannot fly. Others will not take the helicopter out of service unless patient transport.

Drone delivery would be perfect!

State Patrol does “Blood Relays”. But often too much time lost coordinating troopers and getting busy troopers to meet.

  1. First trooper must learn where to go. Time lost finding place and finding the blood bank.
  2. Picks up and transports to his/her jurisdictional line.
  3. Hands-off to next trooper. Sometimes the next trooper has not arrived at the meeting point.
    4 That trooper transports to next trooper.
  4. Last trooper must learn where to deliver.

We take directly from source to hospital blood bank.

  1. Yes, when no traffic and ideal conditions we have attained governor speed.
    Car dealers say it is fine. Others routinely drive at higher speeds.

  2. Tires 2 PSI below Max listed on the tire. Have always had near or at Max to increase fuel mileage.

  3. I cannot understand why hospitals run out. Often it is because of special qualities/factors needed in the product. If emergent, usually platelets. Blood is usually STAT - no lights/siren.


#14
I'm confused. If you need good high-beam visibility, why would you want them turning on and off? Shouldn't something else flash instead so that you can keep your headlights on continuously?

All headlights operate normally. But when off, high beams can alternately flash which is more effective than the light bar. Often no siren pollution when drivers have changed lanes well ahead.


#15

Yes. A pair of SilverStar Ultras are not much less than the $79 LEDs.

Not outdriving headlights. Never do that.
Some hospitals have complained about longer night delivery times but that cannot be helped. Deer and elk and skunks are always a concern.
When opposing traffic headlights diminish my ability to see deer and elk, I also slow.

The Ultra filaments would probably fracture even faster from flashing abuse.
(The 9005s are easy to unplug and change out!)


#16

#17

I don’t think I’d bother. The HIDs low beam were great for seeing animals in the dark but the LEDs we have now seem comparable. Really though turning on the high beams just does not do that much more.

As far as driving 80, we came back through South Dakota last weekend where I90 is now 80 mph limit. What I discovered is that you tend to stay very alert driving at that speed. Back in Minnesota at 70, it just tends to drag and you start day dreaming. Sort of like it used to be when the limit was 55 on the interstate. I didn’t see any reckless driving, just everyone tooling along at a good clip. Actually same thing with the two lanes at 65 instead of the ridiculous 55.


#18

Thank you. I have noticed the same effect! Less boredom. Texas has 85 mph speed limits!
Years ago I complained to CDOT seeking 65 to 70 mph speed limits descending from the Eisenhower Tunnel (Gentle curves, no intersections, 3 lanes.) They increased the descent from 55 to 60 mph.
Have been asking privately-owned E-470 to increase from 75 to 80 mph where safe. Most are traveling 80+ in the 75 mph areas, anyway. The higher speed limit would also attract more users.

The reason for LED high beams is because incandescent filaments may fracture from flashing.
The police department’s donated lightbar has “takedown” lights which I wired to also burn steadily for distant illumination when no opposing traffic. But reflective signs can be blinding.