Acura TL 2002 blower motor

engines
acura
blower-motors
tl

#1

The A/C fan stopped working, went to repair shop and was told there was some corrosion on the blower motor where some cord plugs into the blower motor. I was told due to this the blower motor and the cord has to be replaced.



They didnt not have parts in stock, but scrapped some of the corrosion off and said that would only hold for a day or so. was also told repair would cost over 200.

Is this reasonable? having to replace the blower motor? when i have had corrosion on battery terminals its brushed off and is fine, i have never had to replace battery for it.

Also would this be difficult fix for novice if blower motor needs replacement.?

thanks


#2

I’d get a second opinion.

Was the repair shop you went to a dealer, an independent mechanic, or a chain store?

They told you cleaning of the terminals would only last “a day or so.” I suggest you drive the car and see how long it lasts.

Some blower motors are easy to access and replace, others are not. I don’t know where the blower on your car is located. If you can see it and reach it you could probably replace it yourself, assuming, of course, that it actually needs to be replaced.

I’d try cleaning the terminals and coating the rubber connector with some dielectric grease to keep moisture out.


#3

I went to a chain store.
Thanks for your help.


#4

Make sure the connection is clean and fitting snug. Use some alcohol on the connection to clean it. If things work ok then I would think you are not going to have a further problem with it.


#5

It’s not likely corrosion causing this. Odds are the connector is burning and the word corrosion is being incorrectly used or misinterpreted.
Burning connectors are caused by long term use of a dragging blower motor so yes the blower and wire connector should be replaced.

Although I’ve never changed a blower on a TL the price sounds fair and most blower motors are not that difficult to replace. It usually involves removing the glove box, the kick panel underneath the glove box, etc. Disconnect the wire connector and the small cooling tube, remove 3 screws, and voila; it’s out.