2006 Ford Fusion manual transmission oil change

ford
fusion

#1

Title says it all. I am trying to change the fluid in the manual transmission but I can’t find anything on how much it takes or how to do it. So far all I can find is that it take 75W-90. Can anyone help me with this?


#2

Number 1 is the drain plug.

Number 2 is the fill plug.

Add fluid until fluid runs out the fill hole.

Tester


#3

Make sure you can remove the fill plug before you remove the drain plug.


#4

Also remember that the plugs have specific torque setting, so you need to correctly torque them back on.


#5

Proper torque setting?

TIGHT!

Tester


#6

Somehow that just doesn’t seem to be necessary.


#7

Those drain and fill plugs can be difficult to find on a 10 year old grease-covered transmission. You may have to clean the gunk off before you can see where they are located. On my Corolla at least it is a pretty easy job, once I’m able to find the two plugs.


#8

Transmission cases are usually clean, not grease-covered like George’s transmissions.


#9

So do those little screws that hold various interior trim pieces. Do you worry about them too.


#10

Transmission cases are aluminum, the drain plugs generally should not be tightened beyond 25-30 lb/ft. The large plugs seem to welcome lug nut type torque but that may be excessive.


#11

what does old trans fluid look like? Like the hydro oil in my 30 yr old mower? U only have to remove transaxle to dump it out. Mower works great now.


#12

Your owners manual can be found here:

https://owner.ford.com/tools/account/how-tos/owner-manuals-search-results.html?make=Ford&model=Fusion&year=2006

And yes, 75w90 gear oil (non-synthetic) is used in the manual transmission.

Agree that you should loosen the fill plug first and then the drain.


#13

On my 25 & 45 year old vehicles, if the transmission even remains in the place it is supposed to be, to me anyway, I must be living the good life. Transmission not covered w/ gunk on a 25 year old Corolla? Seems unlikely


#14

You are 100% correct. The torque specifications are not critical like head bolts or lug nuts. They are to help prevent stripping the aluminum case threads. The night vision goggles I maintained, repaired and modified required a nitrogen purge and refill every 180 days. the purge valves were stainless steel very finely threaded into cycolac plastic. They had a torque specification of .5 (point five) inch pounds which was just snug. The goggles objective and eyepiece lens assemblies were plastic to plastic but also very fine threaded. The technical manual instructions for installation were to slowly turn counter clockwise until you hear a click and feel the threads seat. I was amazed that I had never been taught that trick as it applies to anything with threads. My next door neighbor who is a master motor vehicle and aircraft mechanic was changing oil in one of his vehicles with an aluminum pan. He said the drain plug did not feel right and he was afraid of cross-threading it. I shared the trick and he was amazed that he had never heard of it. I’ve found it also works great for light bulbs.