2000 Camry catalytic converter; spec or aftermarket

camry
catalytic-converters

#1

My 2000 Camry needs the catalytic converter

replaced. An aftermarket converter is $300 plus labor. A Toyota converter will cost $1200 to repair. The car has 160,00 miles and we’d like to keep it going another 3 or four years. Opinions please!


#2

The Camry has been the best selling car in America for some time now. There are numerous aftermarket part available for it, including converters. The dealer’s figure is outrageous. Go to any reputable muffler shop or your own mechanic and you will get a suitable unit. The gas and air going through a catalytic converter in a Camry is the same as any other car; so the capacity and fit is the only consideration.


#3

After markets are fine.


#4

We get a lot of posts on this identical subject. Our responses are also identical: Go with the aftermarket part.


#5

Do you know the converter needs to be replaced? How do you know this? Another alternative is one from a salvage yard. None of these are thrown away–the precious metals are recycled if the converter is not sold on the market.


#6

It’s against EPA regulations for a salvage yard to sell a used catalytic converter.

Tester


#7

winarth has a valid point: why are you changing the catalytic converter? Unless there is a verified (by actually troubleshooting) reason for changing the catalytic converter, you’re wasting your money. Catalytic converters seldom go bad without causes, like from the engine inhaling a substance it shouldn’t, or, in quantities it shouldn’t. Some foreign substances (for normal engine combustion) are: motor oil, antifreeze, silicone from sealants, leaded gasoline (rare). Excess quantities of substances are: excess air (lean), or excess fuel (rich).
Just because the check engine light came on, and the code (when scanned) said, “catalytic, or oxygen sensors problems)” is not adequate reason to change the catalytic converter.


#8

True, “unless it has been properly tested and labeled”. Since I know some are on the market I thought someone had figured out how to test and label and still sell at a profit.


#9

Although I have no experience wiht he Camary, I have seen a number of other cars that would set a catalytic converter performance code (P0420) and turn on the service engine soon light, with a cheap aftermarket converter. I would not buy one without a money back guarantee that it will keep the light off.


#10

There is a bit of a story to this. About 18 months ago the check engine light came on, and it was the converter code. The mechanic reset it and said to expect it to come on again shortly. Six months later, the car passed inspection without problem. Now, finally, the light comes on again and a different mechanic again says it is the catalytic converter code. What determines whether this repair is truly needed?


#11

There is a bit of a story to this. About 18 months ago the check engine light came on, and it was the converter code. The mechanic reset it and said to expect it to come on again shortly. Six months later, the car passed inspection without problem. Now, finally, the light comes on again and a different mechanic again says it is the catalytic converter code. What determines whether this repair is truly needed?


#12

“What determines whether this repair {changing the catalytic converter] is truly needed?” is by the mechanic actually checking the voltage values (patterns) of the oxygen sensors (before, and after, the catalytic converter) with a scan tool, or a test meter. The number of times a check engine light comes on doesn’t dictate a repair action being taken without troubleshooting…
You need a mechanic who knows how to use the tools he should be using, and using them properly. You haven’t spoken of such a mechanic, yet.
Hopefully, you can find one in your town.


#13

If the catalytic converter turns out to be the culprit it may have been coated by excess emissions from your engine. Make sure you don’t have a too-rich mixture. If there is an engine issue, fix that and then see if the converter will burn itself clean before buying a new one. A few weeks will tell you if the converter is permanently bad.


#14

In response to the first 3 posts. I am not saying you are wrong and I would be pretty upset if I had to buy a $1200 convertor, but on some cars an aftermarket convertor can/might trigger a fault code. The code will state something like engine operating temp is to low and it goes back to an aftermarket convertor that lets exhaust pass through to quickly. I am not saying it will happen and I personally can live with the ses lamp on if I am going to drive the vehicle into ground, which is what I always do to my cars.