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Tire Dry Rot

When I went to Discount Tire to get a tire leak on one tire repaired, I was told that while I have a lot of tread left on the tires, they have dry rot. Perhaps this is because I don't drive nearly as much as I used to so I am acquiring fewer miles between tire changing. So I am unfamiliar with this phenomenon. My question is whether I should get new tires even though the tread left is fine? Is this dangerous?
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Comments

  • edited October 2010
    How old are the tires? Use this to figure it out:
    http://www.ehow.com/how_5072135_decode-number-determine-tire-age.html

    Can you see any cracks? What did they mean by 'dry rot'?
  • edited October 2010
    I should have mentioned that the tires were bought new in 2004, and the warranty is good for another 20,000 miles, which is why I was so startled. There are no cracks. As far as the definition of "dry rot" goes, that it precisely why I am asking this question on the forum! I take it to mean a kind of disintegration, not in the tread (I don't think) but on the side walls of the tires. But I am not sure. He could just have been trying to sell me new tires, for all I know.
  • edited October 2010
    I was wondering if a definition "dry rot" by the manufacture of your tires is contained in your warranty and if dry rot is a condition that the warranty applies too.
  • edited October 2010
    Check the number on the tire, they're at least 6 years old, but may have been a few years old when they were sold. Much over 6 is getting old for tires.
  • edited October 2010
    Which number?
  • edited October 2010
    I've seen this phenomenon a lot lately and I wonder if recent production methods are producing a tire more susceptible to this - during the last several years, I have tires that aren't old at all that are getting small cracks in the sidewalls. I'm pretty sure a lot of this is due to UV damage, on my vehicles that spend all their time outside.

    I think tire dressing helps to make the rubber last longer, but I'm not good about keeping it applied. I don't know how to describe how to look at the tires, but I think it's gotta be pretty severe dry rot before it becomes a safety issue.
  • edited October 2010
    Look at my first post.
  • edited October 2010
    Sorry. At that point I thought I knew how old my tires were!! Looks like the 45th week of 2002. I don't know if the letters after DOT but before the numbers mean anything, but just in case: HD WC CP3X. By the way, when I look at the tires, I can't see anything, so surely the dry rot cannot be that bad. On the other hand, they seem to be 8 years old.
  • edited October 2010
    Sorry, but that is long enough for dry rot. If you are in an area where the tyres are exposed to ozone or a lot of sun light, I would not want those tyres on my car.
  • edited October 2010
    I think 10 years is about the longest you wanna go on a tire, regardless of miles, before you change it out. If your tires are 8 years old, then it's time to change them based on time, rather than miles(just like an oil change)
This discussion has been closed.