Burned Out Clutch on 2008 Mini Cooper

#21

Hmmm that kinda sucks… A clutch should not ever be the value of the vehicle, I’d get another opinion…and maybe try to ask a shop to install the clutch that you have purchased (but not really purchased yet :wink: and see what they would charge you to install it. You may get the cold shoulder from some places while others will give you a reasonable price.

Other than that… if you’re located near Philly… I like Mini’s and I think I know a guy who can fix them too

#22

Not for me either. If I look at total income vs total tax, mine went up about 1%.

And even though the standard deduction is much higher, I lose almost all of the deductions I could normally take to offset that increase. Like personal property tax for cars (just to keep it car related)…

#23

I’m in Baltimore!

#24

I’m a CPA, and those of us in high tax states, which includes @VDCdriver, lost a lot more through the loss of itemization than we gained through the slight rate reduction. In addition, I no longer have any incentive to make charitable contributions.

3 Likes
#25

@Beth_Knapp. So you’re in Baltimore. That explains why you are “raven” about your BMW problem. Maybe you can find someone there to “tackle” your clutch problem for less than $2000.

#26

Me too! State, local, and real estate taxes are limited to $10,000 as a federal deduction. If you live on one of the coasts or in a large metro area, it’s easy to pay far more than $10,000 for those taxes. That leaves $14,400 to make up to exceed the standard deduction for a couple filing jointly. That isn’t easy. My federal and state taxes went up this year because my state only lets you intermixed deductions if you itemize on the federal form. too bad I’m not extremely rich. Then my taxes would have dropped dramatically.

#27

…other than the goodness of your heart.

3 Likes
#28

Excluding the coastal metro areas in Florida, where we have no state income taxes!

You could say Florida has no taxes, just user fees.

#29

What about real estate taxes? I pay over $10k per year on a 50 year old, typical middle class house in NJ.

#30

Those fall under the user fees I mentioned.

Seriously, there are some counties in Florida that offer virtually no services, so the property taxes are quite low.

#31

Ah, 95% of my real estate taxes go to the school district. 94% of the kids in the high school go on to 4 year colleges,and are thus prepared to get good jobs and make a lot of money, well worth it in my book.

1 Like
#32

I had forgotten about the personal property tax deduction for cars and other things. We don’t have that in NY, the only people in NY that got hurt by the new tax laws here are the people with very expensive homes, not many in my end of the state. I had a friend from Missouri who told me they had to pay personal property tax on everything, cars, clothes, jewelry and I don’t remember what all.

I worded my first post badly, I should have said it applied to MOST people.

#33

So…about the burned-out clutch…

4 Likes
#34

Isn’t there a sales TAX on the purchase of a clutch? (he says with an evil grin)

#35

Whatever user fees Floridians have are subject to the same $10,000 limit, I’m sure.

#36

The only way it’s “worth it” to replace the clutch . . . meaning installing a complete clutch kit, which includes ALL the components needed for the job . . . would be if op buys decent aftermarket parts and does the job herself.

If she were to go this route, I suggest driving the car for about 2 years after the clutch job, or until the next major repair comes calling, which it will. At which point it’s time to dump it like a hot potato

If she’s paying for labor and parts, forget it . . . either scrap the car now, donate it to charity, or give it to a local high school auto shop program

But if you do that, make absolutely sure you’re legally off the hook, in case that new owner doesn’t register the car. That means signing a release of liability. Best thing is to sign it, mail it in, AND do it online also. There are too many horror stories about previous owners racking up penalties, fines, etc., because the new owner never bothered to properly title and register it

4 Likes
#37

Talk to several independent shops for an estimate on the cost to replace the clutch. Also check for a trade school that does car repair or a high school shop will usaly do the repair for free if you buy the parts.

#38

The original Morris Mini clutch was replaced working under the hood with the transmission/engine a one piece casting. On the late model BMW powered minis the engine and transmission must be removed together, then separated like most FWD cars to replace the clutch.

The first FWD I ever drove was an early 60s MG with a variant of the Midget engine and it was fun to drive and supposedly got great mileage but few Americans wanted such a small car even though the interior was roomier than most US compacts. The one I drove had leather upholstery and had a fold down bar in the back of the drivers seat… Gray Poupon, anyone?

#39

NO…it’s because of the deductions.

1 Like
#40

So it’s a $5000 car that needs a $1700 clutch? If it’s in otherwise good shape and you like it, get it fixed and keep it. Just don’t let anyone else drive it. A new car will cost you in many ways and you have to put up with fancy electronics that will be obsolete in a year or two.