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Hybrids and Long Cummutes

Well, I think my question is rather simple (but the answer might not be):



Is there any advantage in buying a hybrid (say a Prius) if you're facing a long highway commute?



My commute is 144 miles per day, four times a week, seven months a year.

I read that hybrids "promise" 45 mpg on highways...but is that true even if the commute is very very long (battery charge goes down to nothing and you're left with the engine).



I would really like to hear the opinion of some knowledgeable people.



Thanks a bunch

Alex
«13

Comments

  • edited March 2008
    There are regular gasoline-powered cars that will meet or exceed the highway fuel economy of the Prius and cost less to purchase. Current hybrids only make economic sense for those who drive a lot of miles per year in stop-and-go traffic.
  • edited March 2008
    ...cummutes... Can't you get a ticket for that???
  • edited March 2008

    The big advantage for the hybrid is city driving. Yes they do get slightly better gas mileage then a comparable car...the now it gets very difficult to justify the cost of buying the hybrid. It'll probably take 10+ years to make of the difference in cost. The Honda Civic gets about 40mpg highway and costs a lot less then the Prius.
  • edited March 2008
    Get a VW TDI . . . I've heard that they get over 55 mpg highway. Rocketman
  • edited March 2008

    If your commute is mostly highway driving, a hybrid is not for you. Check out any of the gasoline compacts, or even the VW diesel. The hybrid advantage is for the city travelers.

  • edited March 2008
    but is that true even if the commute is very very long (battery charge goes down to nothing and you're left with the engine).
    Let me correct this misconception. The battery charge would not go down to nothing on the highway. Yes, you would be using the gasoline engine more, or maybe even all the time, on the highway, but it would also be keeping the batteries charged up.
  • edited March 2008
    "Get a VW TDI . . . I've heard that they get over 55 mpg highway. RRocket man"

    I average about 60 with mine, but then I drive like a little old lady and I have gotten above the rated mileage on every car I have owned.
  • edited March 2008
    Dear NYBo,
    Apart for making economic sense (I completely understand that if you only account for your own costs and not the environmental costs...but that's another story) I can't find gasoline-powered cars that are more efficient than the Prius. I'm looking at the following website: http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/bestworst.shtml and I don't see a car that is more efficient than the Prius.

    Do you have any tips?

    Alex
  • edited March 2008
    Yes, any time you take your foot off the gas, the car's momemtum will start charging the battery. In addition, the battery will be gradually charged up as you drive. One of the main advantages of a hybrid is that you cruise in a high gear, and to pass quickly, the battery kicks in and you get a big boost. On a high end hybrid, the electric motor is called a "green supercharger".

    From a purely economic point of view, a Yaris or Honda Fit will cost less per mile to operate. Where I live Prius cars are bought by people who are making an environmental statement (my dentist, for instance), and who don't really need one for economic reasons. Our family doctor has a Toyota Highlander Hybrid.
  • edited March 2008
    I'm really really sorry for the typo in the title. I know it makes this post sound like it belongs to a porn site. It was a true typo...I apologize.

    Alex
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