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Cracked Windsheild

Forgive me if this has come up before, but how serious is a cracked windsheild from a safety standpoint? I have large (1.5 ft) crack across my windsheild. It is worth fixing? It does not obscure my vision, but I hear that it makes the windsheild dangerous in a crash. Is this true or is this glass repair company propaganda? The crack is too big for a patch job and I don't want to replace the whole windsheild if this is only a cosmetic problem. I have a 2002 Honda Civic, although I imagine this question applies to any car windsheild.



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Comments

  • edited September 2007
    If you have full coverage insurance, most insurers will fix or replace a damaged windshield without requiring you to use the deductible.

    Also, technically, a cracked or damaged windshield will get you a faulty equipment ticket in all states. Usually, an officer will let a crack slide if it doesn't interfere with your vision, but they don't have to. Once they issue the ticket, however, get it replaced. You don't want to get stopped again with that crack still there. Then, you'll need to see the judge, and prove to him that it got fixed.

  • edited September 2007
    The main thing to worry about is not necessarily a collision but the windshield giving way due to air pressure at highway speeds, especially if you hit a large bump or pothole.

    Chances are this will NOT happen, but I'm just pointing out a "what-if" situation.
    Hold your hand out the window, near the car, at an angle similar to the windshield while you're going down the road.
    Feel the force applied and then imagine how much pressure is being exerted against that glass.
    I'm a believer in heading things off before they occur; even the fluky ones.

    A windshield is normally not that expensive a repair if you price it around.
    Most glass here runs about 200 to 275 on most cars including labor.
  • edited September 2007
    It depends on where the crack is located. In some states, if the crack is not in the drivers field of view, it can pass a safety inspection. Field of view varies from state to state and many states won't allow any crack that is greater than a certain size, again size varies by state. If any crack completes a circle, then it has to be replaced in just about all states. You will have to check your states laws.

    Some states have required safety inspections, in those states, you can find yourself at the mercy of the inspector. When I was stationed in Virginia, I had a crack that went along the bottom of my windshield. It passed several inspection several times, but once, I ran into an inspector that had a rather unusual interpretation of the law. The law did not allow a crack that completed a circle larger than 1.5". Mine completed a circle of slightly less than 1". The inspector interpreted the rule as completing a circle greater than the radius of a 1.5" diameter circle.
  • edited September 2007
    The windshield acts as a backstop for the air-bag when it deploys in an accident. If there's a crack in the windshield, the windshield can be literally pushed out of it's opening when the air-bag deploys. This in turn renders the air-bag useless.

    So, if the vehicle is equipped with an air-bag, it's even more important to have a cracked windshield replaced.

    Tester
  • edited September 2007
    It depends on where the crack is located. In some states, if the crack is not in the drivers field of view, it can pass a safety inspection.
    What state is that in??? Only thing I've ever seen is some in some states if the crack is less then 4" and NOT in field of view or less then 1" that's IN the field of view will be ok. Never heard of ANY state that allows a 18" crack be acceptable.
  • edited September 2007
    If you have full coverage insurance, most insurers will fix or replace a damaged windshield without requiring you to use the deductible.
    That really depends on the state. In NH and NY you need seperate glass coverage. And even then I have to pay a $50 deductable for replacement..but if it can be fixed they'll do it for free.
  • edited September 2007
    most states have two levels of insurance.

    one covers the damages and insures you for the damage to others, and passengers in your car.

    the other gives you much more coverage and covers things like windshield replacement.

    here in taxachusetts, we get windshield replacement free!!!! aint that amazing!

    find out which kind of coverage you have. call your insurance office. you MAY be surprised (pleasantly)
  • edited September 2007
    It passed in California, Tennessee and once in Virginia. But this was in the early 80's. The car was a 66 Dodge. The crack ran along the bottom of the windshield.
  • edited September 2007
    Oh yeah MikeInNH, can you tint your windows now?
  • edited September 2007
    my wife reminded me, since she hates for me to get too confusing,

    the two levels of insurance are called,

    collision, and comprehensive.

    collision is the basic minimum you need to get coverage.

    and comprehensive is all the coverage you SHOULD have, if you can afford it!
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