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Unrelenting check engine light. Is following the flow chart the only way to diagnose

I have a 2005 Jeep liberty diesel, blue. I love my car and, shortly after I bought it, Car Talk endorsed it as a good “hey I am cool, single even though I need a large place to carry something. It even acknowledged the color and diesel. Well……
For the last few years the dealership mechanics have been trying to track down intermittent check engine light problems. In January 2009 Changed EGR valve problem seemed resolved.
Now having an elusive problem on a different code. In November 2010 Changed fuel water separator and harness; April 2011 Replaced boost hose. May 2011 Turned off the function for check engine light to turn on intermittently for service. The light returned and was ignored until
In October 2011 they found a small crack in the throttle body. They don’t think the crack is large enough to be setting off the check engine light, but it might be and either way due to the flow chart they say they can’t look any further unless they replace it. My car is driving ok.

Question 1. Should I get a second opinion
Question 2. Can you recommend a diesel mechanic who works on small vehicles in Salt Lake City.
Question 3. My rear drivers side blinker is working inconsistently. If the problem is electrical this is the 3red electrical problem for my Jeep. If my check engine light issues are electrical (I understand the throttle body is partially electrical) Could the crack in the throttle body and my other electrical problems be related?

Comments

  • You should post the actual code here and you might get some more insight. You can enter bess in the flow chart and go on, but sometimes that will lead to false information further in the troubleshooting tree. A crack in the throttle body is a problem and it really needs to be addressed/repaired first. The induction systems are very sensitive to vacuum leaks and that is what you have now.
  • You should post the actual code here and you might get some more insight. You can enter bess in the flow chart and go on, but sometimes that will lead to false information further in the troubleshooting tree. A crack in the throttle body is a problem and it really needs to be addressed/repaired first. The induction systems are very sensitive to vacuum leaks and that is what you have now.
  • Keith, Thank you! So should I repair it even though my car is running fine and the check engine light goes off occasionally.
  • Thats up to you unless you have smog checks where you live?
  • Thanks for the suggestion. I will call the dealership on Monday, get the code and post it here. Thank you.
  • Never give a CEL free access to your wallet, especially if the engine operates normally...
  • Whats a CEL? I assume mechanic.
  • That CEL (check engine light) is just a kid in class waving her hand trying to get you attention because she has the answer. You need to have the codes read. Some places will read them for FREE. Try Autozone or Advanced Auto Parts. Get the exact code (like P0123) not just their translation into English and post it back here.
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