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gasoline -vs- aluminum

An extensive search in as many classic parts catalogs as I can find reveals that ...
I can not buy new or reproduction fuel filler neck hoses for my 1979 Chevy short stepside pickup.
They are age cracked, leak during fill-up , and smell of fumes when parked .
A very tight, quick double S deletes straight generic fuel hose as a possibility.

My idea to improvise a repair is to get some flexible aluminum tubing at Home Depot. ( much like the dryer vent tubing ).

Do youall happen to know how gasoline will react with aluminum ?
Will it leach something from the aluminum that will remain in the fuel supply ?
Will it eat through in short order ?

Do youall have other ''alternate repair'' ideas. ?
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Comments

  • Wow! I can't believe that LMC Truck Parts Catalog wouldn't have a replacement filler neck hose for that truck; I would think they'd carry just about anything under the sun for older trucks, of any make or body-style. If they don't have it, the only other thing I can think of is trying to get one special-ordered through a Chevy dealer. As far as aluminum reacting with the gasoline, well, I would tend to doubt that, since many engines today are either all aluminum or at least have aluminum cylinder heads. I hope this will give you some helpful ideas, but I'd say also check with a mechanic for a professional opinion.

  • Gasoline react with aluminum? Of course not! If you need to improvise for your fuel system, aluminum is perfectly acceptable.

  • Wow! I can't believe that LMC Truck Parts Catalog wouldn't have a replacement filler neck hose for that truck; I would think they'd carry just about anything under the sun for older trucks, of any make or body-style. If they don't have it, the only other thing I can think of is trying to get one special-ordered through a Chevy dealer. As far as aluminum reacting with the gasoline, well, I would tend to doubt that, since many engines today are either all aluminum or at least have aluminum cylinder heads. I hope this will give you some helpful ideas, but I'd say also check with a mechanic for a professional opinion.
  • Whoops, didn't mean to post twice, a little glitch with posting it the 1st time. Anyway, LMC or a dealer for options on where to look for the filler hose, best I can say.
  • edited October 2011
    LMC
    Manes
    JC Whitney
    and dealer's n.o.s. obsolete sources
    = no go.

    LMC has for the fleet-side box, not the step-side box :(
    I phoned them just to double check that the catalog might be an incomplete, mere representation of their possible inventory.
    but alas....
  • edited October 2011
    Aluminum or stainless steel tubing would be fine. I'd be more concerned about what it mates to. Will this go directly to the tank or to another tube which leads to the tank?

    The flexible tubing that is used for clothes dryers is actually aluminized plastic and is very thin. I would not use it if you can find it in your gas filler tube size. I'd use a seamless aluminum or stainless steel tube. You can get it bent to the correct form.
  • I bought some 3" flexible aluminum tubing and used it to fix the venting on my boat. It seems solid enough, but I'm sure I wouldn't trust it to carry fluids with leaking. Whatever material you find I'd test it to be sure it won't leak before installing it in the truck.

    An industrial supply house might have something for you, especially if they can make up custom hoses.
  • Sorry you're not having any luck with LMC or dealer. Uncle Turbo has a good idea there, though, if you can get an industrial supply house to custom-bend a section of aluminum or steel pipe to the shape of your original filler hose. Then you could use something like a radiator hose and cut a couple of pieces to make "end cuffs" to clamp to either end of the metal pipe, to attach it between the fuel tank and the filler neck.
  • What about having a muffler shop bend a section of exhaust tubing and then connnect it with very short lengths of hose and clamps?

    My brother in law has a pair of trucks from this era with step sides that I've done work on but simply can't remember exactly what the pipe looks like. Whether the above suggestion would work or not I have no idea.
    (No, he's attached to them and won't sell them.) :-)

    You might consider checking with CTC Auto Ranch in Denton, TX. They have acres of old stuff out there and may have a good used part. Hope that helps.

  • edited October 2011
    I was thinking on the same line as ok4450, thinking maybe having a piece of exhaust tubing bent to fit. Another option would be take the old hose to an auto parts and see if they had a radiator hose that fit the size and configuration.
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