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Brake noise after tire rotation

First of all, thank you to the person who posted instructions for posting, as the big red "Ask a Question" button was invisible to me.

Now that I've established my observational skills, here's my question:

My wife had the tires rotated on her 2007 Hyundai Santa Fe immediately before we went on a long road trip. After we left, we noticed a high-pitched whining sound at speeds of about 35-70 mph. It did not occur every time we hit that speed, and it generally seemed to go away after we'd been driving for about an hour.

We could make the noise stop every time by braking (as long as the pedal was depressed), or some of the time by turning (but only while the wheel was being turned). Occasionally, going over a particularly big bump could stop or start the noise.

My question is, what color is the car? Wait, no, my question is, is this likely to be the brakes, and if so, could it have been caused by the tire rotation?

Thanks!

Comments


  • That sounds like your brake pad warning strips are just getting to the point that they are warning you that you need to have the brakes done soon.

    Obviously the tire rotation did nothing to prematurely wear the brakes. However, it is possible that someone bumped the warning strip a little while doing the tires. Its just a little thin tab of metal so it wouldn't necessarily take anything dramatic to bump it a little. It could also just be a coincidence.

    So its likely that you're just due for a brake job. But its also possible that the strip got bent enough to hit the rotor prematurely. It would take about 30 seconds with the tire off to check this out.
  • edited August 2011
    Check the lug nuts! If they are ok get the brakes and bearings checked.
  • edited August 2011
    "We could make the noise stop every time by braking ..."

    If that is the case, the sound is not coming from the "brake pad low" warning indicators. The "low warning indictor tabs" rub against the rotors especially when the brakes are applied.

    I suspect the sound is from vibrating shim plates.

    If you had your tires rotated, it's a good chance they lifted your calipers looking for brake wear, and they may have jiggled something. Brake replacements are great money-makers for any shop.

  • If that is the case, the sound is not coming from the "brake pad low" warning indicators. The "low warning indictor tabs" rub against the rotor especially when the brakes are applied.

    That's completely backwards. The tab starts vibrating against the rotor as the wheel spins once it gets close enough to just drag on the rotor. The high pitched squeal is that tab vibrating.

    Once you apply the brake the tab is held firmly against the rotor. It might continue to make some noise but the clamping down on the brake rotor stops the kind of vibration that makes the noise.

    As waterboy said, checking the lug nuts is not a bad idea. But you're likely to find the squeal is the brake warning indicator tab.
  • edited August 2011
    Once you apply the brake the tab is held firmly against the rotor. It might continue to make some noise but the clamping down on the brake rotor stops the kind of vibration that makes the noise.

    Clamping the metal tab firmly against the rotor stops the noise?
    I don't think so, but it's not worth my time arguing with you. Readers can decide on their own who is right.



    As waterboy said, checking the lug nuts is not a bad idea.
    So you think loose lug nuts may be causing the noise? Oh my!
  • Cigroller is correct, and Mechaniker is wrong.
    Case closed.

  • Thanks VDC. I was just trying to figure out whether it was worth my time to argue about it ;-)

    But at least in answer to Mechaniker's question: "Clamping the metal tab firmly against the rotor stops the noise?" Yes. It does. (Although "stops" might not always be the case).
This discussion has been closed.