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Audi Oil Consumption

edited November -1 in Repair and Maintenance
I bought a new Audi A5 with a 2.0 liter turbo engine in August 2010. From the very beginning this car has been using in excess of a quart of oil every 850 miles. I have done some research and it appears that this happens to a small minority of their engines. Audi seems alternatively unwilling or unable to solve the problem. They have performed 3 extensive repairs replacing 2 different engine seals-one of them twice. The consumption has now actually worsened to about a quart every 800 miles. Now they are starting to tell me that my consumption is really not all that far from Audi's "minimal acceptable limit of a quart every 1,000 miles". Why does the oil consumption vary so widely in their new engines? Why can't they fix the problems? Why do they act like we are unreasonable to expect the same consumption of all the lucky A5 drivers?
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Comments

  • edited April 2011
    What part of "minimal acceptable limit" don't they understand? While Audis are know oil users, this is clearly excessive, even by their own standards. Assuming you've contacted Audi USA it's time to start going after lemon law status, a lawyer may be needed.
  • edited April 2011
    I agree that this level of oil consumption is not acceptable, but, based on at least 3 prior posts over the past couple of years, it is apparently not unusual for new or new-ish Audis to consume as much as 1 qt every 600 miles. And, those same unhappy Audi owners also reported that neither their dealer nor Audi on the corporate level seemed to share their concerns.

    Unfortunately, I don't think that your experience is an isolated one, and except for a Lemon Law claim, I don't know what else to suggest. Start educating yourself about the terms of the Lemon Law in your state!
  • edited April 2011
    My answer is that Audi has not come to a internal agreement on how to handle this OR the internal agreement is to baffel and stall and give people the run around. It has been some years since I dealt with Audi and I must conclude there is something about these cars that people really like as they do keep on buying them. I ask, other than the oil problem do you like your car?
  • edited April 2011
    My cousin has a 2006 A4 that drinks the oil like crazy. The tail pipes are very oily and black soot. The car has very low mileage and they took it back and they tested it and said it was fine. They will never buy another. I went through the same thing with VW. They dont care. Good luck fighting that.
  • edited April 2011
    [b][i]My Opinion: Lemon, Either Just Your Car Or Who Knows How Many Units Are Afflicted ?[/i][/b]

    "[i]Now they are starting to tell me that my consumption is really not all that far from Audi's "minimal acceptable limit of a quart every 1,000 miles".[/i]"

    [b]Key words: . . . [i]"minimal acceptable limit of a quart every 1,000 miles" [/i] . . . [/b]

    The thing is that 1,000 miles per quart is a stretch. Some manufacturers use 2,000. I think GM is 2,000. Then there's the fact that your car is getting worse.

    I think they owe you a whole new car so that you don't suffer any more inconvenience while they play games trying to sort this out.

    Suggest that they take the take this car off your hands to have a vehicle they can study and find out what's going wrong with Audi quality control before it leads to a poorer image and lost sales.

    You've been through enough.

    CSA
  • edited April 2011
    The oil issue and more importantly the dealer and corporate reactions have been disappointing to appalling. Ironically, other than that I like the car a lot.It handles very well and is fun to drive.I'm 6'3" and there is plenty of head and leg room.Comfortable and I think the car is very attractive.The design of the controls for the electronics could be a lot better in my opinion but not a big issue and certainly one I knew about prior to purchase. If it weren't for the poor response to my oil issue I'd be an Audi fan boy. At present I want out ASAP and barring some earth changing event would not buy one again.
  • edited April 2011
    What you should do is take your car to a private mechanic, and have an engine compression and leakdown test performed. This will give you an idea of how the engine is doing in those stats, and see if the car is within or out of spec in that regards.

    As for oil burning, there are two ways to burn oil:

    - Oil control rings are shot, and allowing oil to be burned in the combustion chamber.
    - Oil is being turned into mist, and consumed by the engine via the PCV system.

    The first one is harder - build the engine better.
    The second one is easier for you to do - install a catch can to see if this is the cause of the oil consumption, or disconnect the PCV system so that the oil mist won't be consumed by the engine.

    Your engine has several strikes against it.

    First off, it is a Direct Fuel Injection engine.
    On top of that, it has a turbo installed on it.

    The combination of these two items leads to raw fuel being forced past the piston rings, which then contaminates the engine oil, which lowers the Flash Point of the engine oil. When the engine oil gets hot, the oil turns into mist A LOT EASIER than fresh clean oil does, and gets sucked into the PCV system, and burned when it gets sucked into the combustion chamber, and further fouls up the compression and oil control rings with carbon.

    The biggest cause of the poor performance of these engines is owners who beat on the car when its cold, in the very early stages of the engine breaking in. With a turbo DFI engine, you should never drive the car under boost when it is cold, and the various metals haven't yet expanded to their proper sizes. This leads to excess wear in the engine, that never can be restores without a rebuild.

    What Audi/VW should have done, was install a variable redline in the car when the engine is cold, like what Mazda has done with the RX8. When the engine is first started up, the RX8 has two lights that bring the red line of the car down from 9k rpms to 5500 rpms, and when slightly warmed up, the first light goes out, allowing you to re the car to 7500 rpms. This prevents the owners of the RX8 from abusing their cars when cold, causing increased wear of the engine, leading to increased engine repairs under warranty.

    The 5500 rpm restriction goes out very quickly, too. Usually about 5 to 10 blocks, depending on temperature. The second one turns off after about 2 miles of driving, or when the engine thermostat gets opened by coolant temperature.

    I believe that if Audi did the same, there would be less problems.

    BC.
  • edited April 2011
    Unless they have performed a compression and leakdown test at a minimum then they've really done nothing to diagnose the problem at all. Do you know if this has been done?

    You state that you bought it new. Does this mean brand new as in 4 or 5 miles on it or did it have a 100 on it, etc?
  • edited April 2011
    I also recommend seeing an independent garage for an engine/turbo diagnostic. It is possible that the problem lies in the turbo and not in the engine. A good mechanic can get to the bottom of this for a couple of hours of diagnostic time.
  • edited April 2011
    "Your engine has several strikes against it.

    First off, it is a Direct Fuel Injection engine.
    On top of that, it has a turbo installed on it.

    The combination of these two items leads to raw fuel being forced past the piston rings, which then contaminates the engine oil, which lowers the Flash Point of the engine oil. When the engine oil gets hot, the oil turns into mist A LOT EASIER than fresh clean oil does, and gets sucked into the PCV system, and burned when it gets sucked into the combustion chamber, and further fouls up the compression and oil control rings with carbon. "

    I'm not sure where you get this information about raw fuel leaking past the rings to dilute the oil. That is not a realistic drawback to direct injection engines unless, of course, an injector fails a starts constantly spraying fuel into the cylinder (which is also a problem with multi-point injection). It would be probably good to look at these websites to see some more information on direct injection systems:

    About.com
    http://cars.about.com/od/thingsyouneedtoknow/a/directinjection.htm

    HowStuffWorks.com
    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/direct-injection-engine.htm

    canadiandriver.com
    http://www.autos.ca/auto-tech/auto-tech-direct-fuel-injection-vs-port-fuel-injection

    BTW, Diesel engines have used direct injection for over a decade without problems.
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