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Frozen Windshield Washer Fluid

Here in Minnesota we are currently going through a deep freeze, consequently I noticed a gallon jug of Windshield washer fluid in my garage frozen solid. Then it occurred to me that the other empty jug is in both of our vehicles. My 1995 Honda Accord V6 has a windshield washer fluid container that is frozen solid. What do I do? I really don't want to wait for March. FYI I purchased the "Peak" fluid at Walmart for a great price this fall but neglected to check at what temp. it is good for. I have never had to do that before because I LIVE IN MINNESOTA.
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  • edited January 2010
    Remove the washer fluid reservior, hoses, and washer nozzles and bring them inside to melt the frozen fluid. Or find a heated garage.

    Tester
  • edited January 2010
    Hopefully it is not frozen solid, but more "slushy". If it freezes solid it might damaged the plastic tubing from the pump to the squirt nozzles.
    You mentioned a garage, I'd try to use some sort of portable heater to raise the temp in the garage for a day or so to unfreeze the fluid, then I'd use a turkey baster to empty the rest of the fluid. Replace with the lowest temp rated fluid.
    You could even try using an old electric blanket wrapped around the tank to heat it, but that will not help thaw the fluid in the lines.
    I seem to remember the Peak stuff being rated to -20 deg. I don't think I've seen anything rated any lower than that.
  • edited January 2010
    Home Depot sells lots of solvents in the paint section. See if you can find a couple of quarts of pure alcohol (ethyl alcohol, denatured alcohol) and add that to the washer tanks. In a day or two it will melt the ice. next time you buy washer fluid, read the label..
  • edited January 2010
    I agree that taking the reservoir off the car and bringing it inside is the best choice. There are usually only a couple of bolts holding it in. The local gas station can remove it for you easily, then take it home to melt. The tubes and pump and nozzles can be defrosted in place with a hair dryer.
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