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CVT Problems on a 2005 Ford 500

Recently, the input shaft on my 2005 Ford 500 (AWD) broke. It's still under warranty and Ford is now in the process of deciding if they will rebuild ($3800) or replace ((>$5000) the CVT. Whichever route they take, the warranty will be the same (12K miles or 12 months). My question is should I push for the replacement or will the rebuilt option be sufficient. Given the difference in price, I'm assuming they'll go with the rebuilt option and I'll have to escalate to get a replacement. I had other problems with the transmission within the first year (nothing as serious as this) and I'm wondering if a new replacement will have those same issues.

Comments

  • edited January 2010
    A Ford 500 uses a snowmobile transmission?? I thought only mini-cars (Subaru Justy) used them. But for sure, push for a whole new tranny..$5000 is a LIST price..The actual cost is 40% of that...Why risk a botched job of rebuilding yours?? I would NOT be owning this car 12 months from now...
  • edited January 2010

    I don't really think that the customer has the option here.
    The warranty gives the manufacturer the ability to repair the transmission as it sees fit. If I was in your position, I would also want a new transmission, but I doubt that you will be able to sway Ford in their decision regarding how to resolve the problem.
  • edited January 2010
    Ford offered the AWD with CVT when they re-introduced the 500 in 2005. It has had mixed reviews. I've had it in the shop twice previously for repairs on the CVT.
  • edited January 2010
    Given that I have either purchased or leased 6 vehicles from this dealership in the past 17 years, I am going to ask them to advocate a replacement with Ford on my behalf. I've had lots of other problems with this vehicle (front end, steering column, air conditioning) such that I might also pursue a lemon law claim. How they handle this issue will definitely affect my decision re whether or not to pursue.
  • edited January 2010
    Some years back I bought a 1990 Ford Aerostar from a used car dealer but it had some factory warranty remaining. I had transmission problems and the Ford dealer rebuilt the transmission under warranty. The first time the dealer rebuilt the transmission it wouldn't go into overdrive. The service manager found the overdrive band on the technician's workbench so it had to come apart again. However from that point on, the transmission worked well until I sold the Aerostar 100,000 miles later.
    On the other hand, I had engine problems under warranty. A cylinder head had a crack and in stripping down the engine, the service manager reported that a cylinder wall was scored and the entire engine would be replaced (this was also under warranty). I asked the service manager why they just didn't hone the cylinder wall and he said that Ford wouldn't allow this. Of course, I was delighted to have a new engine.
    My experience with Ford on major warranty problems is that they seemed to do what was right. A good technician will probably rebuild your transmission correctly.
  • edited January 2010
    The dealership makes more money if their own mechanics get paid by the flat-rate hour to repair it..
  • edited January 2010
    PS - so far the vote is to push for a replacement. Does anybody have any good points I can use with Ford regarding why a replacement is better for me than a rebuild? THANKS
  • edited January 2010

    No matter what the dealership wants to do, the ultimate decision will be made on the corporate level. I agree that they should give you a new transmission, but corporations do not always make decisions that are the best in the long run.
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