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new tire placement

Been having a debate about where to install 2 new tires. I'm being told that they must go to the rear, regardless of whether the vehicle is fwd or rwd. I say if you can't steer it or stop it, it ain't gonna matter much. What do you think?
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Comments

  • edited December 2009
    I think this issue is WAY over-blown.. Putting new tires on the front is certainly going to change the way the car steers. Most drivers quickly figure this out and compensate their steering responses and stay out of trouble..When you put them on the back, the steering response stays pretty much the same as it was so accident investigators and trial lawyers are kept under control..

    Conventional wisdom say the new tires will have better grip under all conditions but that's simply not true. The worn tires are likely to have better grip on dry pavement, where most of us spend 90% of our time..So the cars handling characteristics will always be changing depending on road conditions. All of this could be sorted out on a skid=pad, but few of us leave the tire store and head for a skid-pad...
  • edited December 2009
    I agree. On the back generally advised. But consider you'll never be able to rotate them safely unless you buy 2 more, as the fronts on a fwd will wear out faster and the rears will always be better. That's why you should try to start with 4 equally matched tires. Caddyman is right about the differences in traction depending upon condition, making if a safety crap shoot when cornering that's weather depended with just two tires being replaced on either axle.
    To me, it's how different the performance of the tires are instead of just, one set is new and one is not. But a tire company has to say something and at least to sell you two if you can't afford 4. When will they say.."you're safer driving with the older tires until you can afford 4" and run the risk of you walking ?
  • edited December 2009
    Kicking a dead horse, aren't we? This gets debated almost weekly.

    New tires on the REAR, regardless.

    If the front tires are so bad you can't steer or stop, you need four new tires, not just two.
  • edited December 2009
    What are you trying to do ? Make it so simple the rest of us who don't have a life have nothing to talk about ? :) Most topics around here repeat with the weather.
  • edited December 2009
    If the rear tyres loose grip when you are doing an stop, the back end of the car will end up in front with you looking where you have been and not where you are going. Not good.

    Under normal conditions and even some harsh conditions you will not get that problem, but it may show up under emergency conditions, which of course is the worse possible time.

    If you look at the tyre manufacturer, car manufacturer and tyre retailer sites you will find they all tell you to put the best on the back.
  • edited December 2009
    Doesn't matter as long as both sets have good tread depth.
  • edited December 2009
    I agree that the new tire location is not important. I carry that to buying one tire if my car needs only one tire and it gets installed wherever the bad tire was located and have never had a problem in the winter snow.

    One thing that should be mentioned in the same sentence by the new tires always on the back advocates is that you must also buy new tires with the same traction rating as the old ones but that is overlooked.

    It can be speculated that each tire will have frequently if not always have different traction situations such as weight distribution differences from front to rear, fat driver sitting on one side and no passengers, oil slick, sand, road marking paint or leaves on one side and not the other, centrifugal force to lean car to one side around a curve or corner, tire pressure differences and what else I can't think of to make inherent minor traction differences among tires fade into insignificance. It may be a false assumption too that each side of a vehicle weighs identically and this is especially true with motorhomes.
  • edited December 2009
    [i] I carry that to buying one tire if my car needs only one tire and it gets installed wherever the bad tire was located and have never had a problem in the winter snow. [/i]

    The instructions for putting the best tyres on the back are made for emergency conditions, not normal driving. Under normal driving conditions, including snow and ice, it does not really come into play. It only comes into play under emergency conditions when you are loosing control of your car. Many people are lucky enough that this never happens to them, but when it does it is most often very serious.

    The car manufacturers and tyre manufacturers all agree on this issue and they have the test tracks to safely test such issues.

    [b] Everyone please remember that under emergency conditions your car will not respond as it does during normal driving. [/b]
  • edited December 2009
    Quote: "The instructions for putting the best tyres on the back are made for emergency conditions, not normal driving. Under normal driving conditions, including snow and ice, it does not really come into play. It only comes into play under emergency conditions when you are loosing control of your car. Many people are lucky enough that this never happens to them, but when it does it is most often very serious." Unquote

    This is fearmongering and I don't buy it. If it is vital for new tyres (sic) to be installed on the rear axle, then why is this not specified in my owner's manuals? Why do car manufacturers and tire manufacturers not address the perils of eventual rotation of new tires from the back to the front? Rear tires can wear very slowly and can be like new at the expected 6000 to 8000 mile rotation mileage.

    Emergency conditions that require skillful driving to avoid losing (not loosing) control during winter are not at all uncommon where I live.
  • edited December 2009
    My wife once delivered mail on a Star route in Colorado, in the mountains at 8500 feet elevation. In the winter, I put a PAIR of snow tires (new ones) on the front of her Subaru hatchback fwd and away she went. 70 miles a day for years. I never changed the rear tires, they seemed to last forever..She never spun out either..
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