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Hybrids as emergency vehicles

I have heard that using hybrids for emergency vehicles is problematic due to adding emergency lights and radio equipment causing problems with the electrical systems. Is this true?
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Comments

  • edited February 2009

    I doubt it causes problems. But I'm sure there would be a drastic decrease in gas mileage compared to the NON Emergency vehicle. What Hybrid are you talking about? Which one is actually big enough and practical enough to be used as a Emergency vehicle??
  • edited February 2009
    We aree considering a Ford Escape Hybrid, however, I have heard rumours that added electrical devices such as emergency light bars, radio equipment, etc. have caused problems with the electrical systems in hybrids. I like the idea of a hybrid for our patrol usage but I worry about this potential concern. I would like to be sure of my facts. Do you, or anyone you know have any ideas or suggestions on how to research this?
  • edited February 2009
    A company that installs emergency vehicle lighting should be able to tell you whether or not the vehicle's electrical system can handle the load. I don't see why the Escape Hybrid would have any more difficulty with this than the standard Escape.

    Talk to someone with experience, and stop listening to rumors.
  • edited February 2009
    We aree considering a Ford Escape Hybrid, however, I have heard rumours that added electrical devices such as emergency light bars, radio equipment, etc. have caused problems with the electrical systems in hybrids.
    Where did you hear this b*ll from?? What's the source??

    I don't see how there could be an electrical problem. Hooking up lights and/or sirens have NOTHING to do with the Hybrid system. They are completely separate systems.

    The ONLY thing I'd be concerned with is expecting great gas mileage. It should get better then gas mileage then the NON-Hybrid version (especially if a lot of city driving is involved). But there should be no safety issue what so ever.
  • edited February 2009
    Its interesting how we(US) view an emergency vehicle used for patrol needing to be large.

    Majority of the civilized world uses smaller vehicles than a crown vic with great success.



  • edited February 2009
    Explore what upgrades a non-hybrid needs to be put into use as a emergengy vehicle,will the vehicle you want to use also accept these upgrades? I don't think the hybrid can enter service without upgrades just like the conventional vehicle cannot.
  • edited February 2009
    Ask your local police department what their views are on the subject.

    Police vehicles (except for those used for community services) are beefed up to handle the extra electrical loads. (heavy duty alternators, dual batteries, etc)

    EMS personnel should be able to advise you as well.

    Who would know better than the people who have tried them or actually use hybrids for emergency use?

    You would think the engineers would, but that doesn't always hold true as everyone has different uses and circumstances.
  • edited February 2009
    I don't see why not. Most emergency vehicles are not Hondas and Toyotas, but there are some SUV hybrids that would be just fine.
  • edited February 2009
    Majority of the civilized world uses smaller vehicles than a crown vic with great success.
    I suggest you do a little research on that. The US is BY FAR way ahead of the rest of the civilized on Emergency Trama. FAR FAR ahead of the rest of the world. The US pioneered the on-site trama care...which many countries are now just adopting. Most other countries just grab and go (we use to do that 30 years ago). Now our EMT's arrive and provide life saving care and stabilize the patient before transport. Try carrying all equipment needed for true EMT care in a Crown Vic!! You'll need a trailer or a roof-rack.
  • edited February 2009
    What kind of emergency are you talking about? If it basically a haul gear hear to there then you should have no problems. Many of the emergency vehicles that I now are also needed to, in a pinch, be used as a push or pull vehicle.

    If you are not in a city I don't see how a hybrid would be beneficial. The vehicle will either not be stopping enough, driving fairly fast, or accelerating quickly under any of those situations you would be using your gas engine more anyway.
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