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AWD and chains

Our Toyota Highlander is all-wheel drive; do we put chains on the front tires, rear tires, or all four?
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Comments

  • edited December 2008
    What does Toyota have to say about chains in the owner's manual? Why are you using chains?
  • edited December 2008
    If you invest in a set of 4 winter tires, you will not have to worry about where to install chains, or for that matter, go to the trouble of installing and then removing those chains every time that the road conditions change.

    And, more importantly, if you don't begin to read your Owner's Manual, you may make mistakes with more issues than with just tire chains. Some vehicles can be safely operated with tire chains, but the design of other vehicles does not permit the installation of tire chains without damage being done to the vehicle.

    A well-meaning forum member could give incorrect information that could cause damage to your vehicle. The Owner's Manual should be your trusted source for information regarding the safe and economical operation of the vehicle.
  • edited December 2008
    one thing i have to say about some of the ignorant people in this forum when it comes to snow chains is your all rude dumb and dont know jack about snow chains. ill admit i have a 98 4x4 chevy silverado and dont know the best way to install them. but i do know that im not worried about truly needing them but more the fact that washington state patrol in the past few days required all vehicles including awd and 4x4 to chain up or turn around over i90 over the passes. now with that said. ive always heard on a 4x4 truck you want one chain on the right front and one on the left rear or if possible on all 4 tires, but this week i've heard to put them both on front and i've been told both on the rear. i've come to the conclusion none of you truly know anything about chains and ill just have to call state patrol as even the tire shops gave mixed advice. so ill give some advice

    dont listen tto anyone in hear but me!!!!!! GO and call your local state or highway patrol for advice.
  • edited December 2008
    [b]"dont listen tto anyone in hear (sic) but me!!!!!! GO and call your local state or highway patrol for advice."[/b]


    Unfortunately, the police are not likely to be technical experts regarding the AWD system on a Toyota Highlander. While it is a good idea to consult with the police regarding statutes that might mandate the use of tire chains in certain conditions, the Owner's Manual is still the best source of information regarding that specific vehicle's compatibility with tire chains.

    If the chains do not have sufficient clearance with any one of a number of suspension, driveline, or steering components on a Highlander, or if the driveline is just not designed for the use of tire chains, the result could be...very expensive...and no warranty is going to cover owner-inflicted damage like that.

    As I said previously, [b]"A well-meaning forum member could give incorrect information that could cause damage to your vehicle. The Owner's Manual should be your trusted source for information regarding the safe and economical operation of the vehicle."[/b]
  • edited December 2008
    Only in extreme conditions, say if all four tires are spinning on ice, or off roading. If you have only ONE set and must "git er done", put them on the front more maximum bite, but I wouldn't go driving for miles on end yadayadayadayadayadayada all the way unless the ENTIRE trip was on ice or feet of snow. Otherwise , with only one set, put them on the back if expect to do many miles of driving with them on.
    My BFG all-terrain T/A have been great tires for snow and mud and driving between 4x4 episodes with no chains.
  • edited December 2008
    Agree...in general cars (and a highlander is a car not a truck) don't do well with chains. Highlanders are too expensive and delicate to trust with anything but really good snow tires.
    Like the guy who spends $30K on a boat and skimps on a mooring;fool's choices.
    Tires are the only thing that keeps a potentially fine performing car in touch with the road.
  • edited December 2008
    If you don't have mountain passes to climb, don't even think of using chains on AWD systems. AWD will fail if you use a slightly different size tire on one wheel. 4WD is a better system for use with chains if the police require them.
  • edited December 2008
    Even if the manual of your Highlander said that chains were appropriate, they are so owner dependent, fitment wise, that only the most experience in their use "should use them". Chains on a truck is a much more forgiving situation. Mounting and maintaining chains while you drive, is not for the unknowing.
  • edited December 2008
    > [b]one thing i have to say about some of the ignorant people in this forum when it comes to snow chains is your all rude dumb and dont know jack about snow chains.[/b]

    Do you hear yourself?
  • edited December 2008
    Joe

    No, I'm fairly sure that he doesn't hear himself, otherwise he wouldn't make such rude and ignorant statements about others who are giving valid advice in a civil manner.

    Isn't it richly ironic when someone calls other people dumb while he himself is unable to put together even one sentence without major errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar? Then, when you throw in advice that is potentially dangerous, natedawg2037 is just a one man festival of wrong-headedness, as well as rudeness.
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