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Your Summer Driving Tips?

edited November -1 in The Show
You've seen Tom and Ray's summer driving tips, but we'd also like to hear from you. What suggestions do you have, for assuring a safe, breakdown-free summer road trip? (Because, after all, who among us wants to be stuck at the in-laws?)

Share them right here -- and thanks!

Comments

  • edited June 2008

    1) Check the level of your coolant. If necessary, fill with a 50/50 mix of coolant and water.

    2) Check the tension of your serpentine belt. Tighten it if it is loose in order to provide proper power to your A/C compressor and your alternator.

    3) Unless you have a maintenance-free battery, check the level of the electrolyte in the battery. More batteries fail in hot weather than in cold weather.

    4) Leave the car windows open slightly when parking the car.

    5) Leave Fido at home, since just a few minutes in a parked car could be fatal to him.

    6) Park in the shade whenever possible.

    7) If it appears that your engine is overheating, pull over immediately, shut off the engine and don't open the radiator cap.

    8) Check your tire pressure. Tires that are underinflated are more subject to blowout at high speeds in the summer than in the winter.

    And, last but not least--

    9) DON'T warm up the engine!
  • edited June 2008
    After all of the vehicle prep you can think of,also think of the TRIP. Take a leisuely drive to try not to push your vehicle for long long hours of high speed operation. Stop once in a while as your bladder will advise you and make the most of the stop. See the sights, get something to drink, clear you head, just take breaks along the way. Your car and your psyche will last with more enjoyable results and it might actually feel like vacation and not a race with a schedule. In March my brother drove from Ohio to New Mexico and back with this theory in mind, taking in a lot of sights and stops along old route 66. Only one extra day of driving, but what a nice little trip he said.
  • edited June 2008
    Drive a almost new car, have it serviced leaving enough time for serviced induced concerns to develope and be addressed. Do not start a trip on a car fresh out of service car no matter who did it IMHO And do your part as the driver while on the trip check the tires,pull the oil stick, do a light check,verify the spare and jack are serviceable pay attention.This advice applies to rental cars also I have rented cars with flat spares. Our local paper ran a story about a guy who rented a car with expired registration,he had to fight with the rental company to get the ticket paid.
  • edited June 2008
    Expired inspection stickers on rental cars aren't that rare. I've known at least three people who were ticketed for expired Texas State Inspections while driving a rental car. Apparently the rental companies don't think to check this. Technically speaking, they aren't responsible for the ticket, fines and increase auto insurance rates (in Texas this is a MOVING violation such as speeding). None paid the ticket for those I know that received tickets despite complaints. Even if they did, who is going to pay for the increase in auto insurance? Better check these items yourself anytime you are getting into an unfamiliar vehicle.

    One thing that may help in traveling is having a cell phone. Even the best maintained vehicles, no matter how new, can have a break down.
  • edited June 2008
    Always plan your trip so the sun is shining in on the passenger side.
  • edited June 2009
    CHEAP AIR CONDITIONING ~~
    May have heard this on your radio show, but it works and I use it often.

    Instead of turning on the air conditioning, turn on the defroster. It cools adequetly and is cheaper.
    Larry k
  • Stay cool and keep your money.
    Comfort and convenience are great, but they shouldn't put you on a treadmill. Here's how to get cool and stay cool for many summers to come:
    1) Don't run the air conditioner on recirculate (max) UNLESS the vehicle is already cool inside. Otherwise, you will burn the refrigerant or overpressurize the system, creating a leak, making the A/C useless. An acquaintance with the same make and model of car as mine, but a year newer, had to have her air conditioner repaired (presumably because she ran the A/C on max when hot), while my car never needed A/C repairs for the five plus years I owned it.
    2) Instead, with the windows partly open, run the blowers at top speed with unprocessed (temperature set to cold, but no A/C)air until the air coming out of the blowers is nearly the same as the outside air.
    3) Then, turn on the air conditioner (still not on recirculate or max) and run until the interior of the vehicle is noticeably cooler than the exterior was.
    4) Only after doing all of the above should you run the A/C on max or recirculate, if you wish, for efficient operation.
    The above methods may use more fuel, but that is a pittance compared to air conditioning repairs. Don?t be penny-wise and dollar foolish.
  • edited May 2010
    If you're driving through a town or city, take the time to really look both ways before entering an intersection since the number of bikers on the roads is continually increasing! Also, when your traffic light turns green, wait a few seconds since the latest fad is running red lights rather than stopping!
  • edited June 2010
    Its a great idea to teach driving.I appreciate your thinking and work.good job.And thanks for sharing.
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